Australian woman fed up after her friend keeps buying exactly the same clothes as her

Fed up woman begs for advice after her friend continues buying the EXACT same clothes as her – so what would you do?

  • An Australian woman has revealed her friend keeps copying her outfits
  • The woman said she was initially ‘flattered’ but now feels annoyed at her friend
  • She explained that her friend ‘repeatedly’ buys the exact same clothes as her
  • She turned to the internet for advice about how she should approach her friend 

A frustrated woman has revealed how she feels ‘deflated’ after her friend keeps copying her outfits every time she buys a new piece for her wardrobe.

The woman, from Western Australia, shared her ‘first world problem’ on social media, explaining how she feels ‘petty’ for being furious at her friend for buying the exact same clothes as her.

‘This has happened repeatedly and I was flattered at first but now I feel deflated and petty at how much energy I expend thinking about this,’ she wrote in a Facebook group.

The woman – who’s on a tight budget – said she spent a lot of time building her wardrobe, only for her friend to ask what the brand is before she spontaneously ‘whips out her phone and buys it then and there’.

A frustrated woman has revealed how she feels ‘deflated’ after her friend keeps copying her outfits every time she buys a new piece (stock image)

Poll

How do you feel when a friend buys something you own?

  • Flattered 0 votes
  • Annoyed 0 votes

‘Wondering if anyone has found themselves in a situation with a friend where they start buying everything you buy, specifically wardrobe items?’ she asked. 

‘For context, I’ve really invested in what I wear, I am on a small budget and think long and hard before I purchase, scouring discounts and secondhand.’

She decided to turn to the internet for advice because she doesn’t know how to approach the situation. 

‘I can’t think of a way to broach this with her so I guess I’m hoping others have been in a situation like this so I don’t feel so alone and gross in my smallness,’ she said.

Her post was met with mixed responses, with a majority saying they are ‘completely’ on her side.

‘I’ve had this happen to me. I would have an honest conversation with her. One or two things are ok – and as long as you’re not wearing them in the same place… But more is quite thoughtless of your friend,’ one wrote.

Poll

What would you do if a friend copied your outfit?

  • Confront them 0 votes
  • Tell them it bothers you 0 votes
  • Ignore it 0 votes
  • Never tell them where you got it from again 0 votes

Another said: ‘It would bother me if someone did this to me so I don’t think you’re being small. But she might not realise it bothers you.’ 

Many urged her to simply stop telling her friend about where she got her items from.

‘I’d feel the same like you. Perhaps just stop telling her about your purchases and just change topic if she asks. I learned a while back it’s better to keep most things like that to myself,’ one said.

Another wrote: ‘Stop sharing the information of brands when questioned. Tell her you’re comfortable.

While one woman suggested: ‘You could maybe just start being really vague like “oh it’s vintage” or “my sister gave it to me so now sure where it’s from” or “oh, I’ve had this for years”.’

Others said the woman should just be ‘honest’ and tell her how she really feels. 

Another woman who was in a similar situation said she was able to ‘get through this many times’ after she watched Oprah interview someone who was going ‘through the same thing’.

‘I clearly recall Oprah saying the phrase: “No one can steal your light”,’ she said.

Meanwhile, some women who have been buying the same outfits as their best friends for years said they never had any issues.

‘My best friend and I do this but I love it. She bought jeans, a top or bikini I like so I got it too. She likes it and we have photos in matching stuff which is cute I think. If she gets something I already have, I’m flattered she likes it,’ one wrote.

While another said: ‘My best friend and I do this all the time and we love it.’

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Giant shed home in Glen Forest off Great Eastern Highway, WA, is for sale

Incredible giant shed hits the market featuring a living room that doubles as a 1950s diner and a goods lift to take the owner up to their bedroom – so would you live there?

  • Shed-style house with eight bedrooms and six bathrooms is on the market 
  • The home off the highway in Glen Forrest, WA, has one person living in it
  • Giant shed built next to standalone 1950s cottage, and has two separate levels
  • The property, which is on the market, is expected to be sold for $850-900K

A property with three standalone houses on it has hit the market offering homeowners eight bedrooms, six bathrooms, four kitchens and a living room decorated like a 1950s diner.

Set on an acre-and-a-half plot of land a giant shed-style home with over 800sqm of floor space has been built alongside a 1950s cottage at 2350 Great Eastern Highway Glen Forrest, 30 minutes south of Perth in Western Australia.

The residence – currently lived in by one person – is expected to sell for between $850-$900,000 and includes a theatre, function room and two powered workshops.

This property in Glen Forrest, 30 minutes south of Perth in Western Australia, includes a 1950s diner-style living room (pictured)

The house includes the original cottage (left), a giant two storey shed-style home (middle), a small studio and two fully functioned powered workshops

The house includes the original cottage (left), a giant two storey shed-style home (middle), a small studio and two fully functioned powered workshops

Some of the furniture inside the house was bought from a famous West Australian restaurant called Jimmy Dee's

Some of the furniture inside the house was bought from a famous West Australian restaurant called Jimmy Dee’s

Real estate agent Mike Steadall from Earnshaws Real Estate told Daily Mail Australia the house was ‘bigger than Ben Hur.’ 

‘It was built by a dad and his son. They bought the original cottage which was the blue one next door first and then decided they wanted to build this shed, and it’s enormous,’ he said.

‘It’s massive, I’ve taken people through and they’re just open-mouthed.

‘The son’s a FIFO and dad was retired, you try and stand there and imagine why they built this house and I can’t get my head around why it’s so big.

‘And it’s awkward big, it’s a blokes big, there’s not a woman’s touch in there I believe.’

Mr Steadall said he expected it would go to ‘a very unique buyer’, such as an extended family of around 20 relatives, a business owner or someone ‘creative’ who wants to put their own spin on the home. 

He said it could be split into three or four homes as the shed had two separate spaces with their own kitchens, including an elevator which makes the top level more accessible and double-glazed windows facing the highway. 

The entire residence has six bathrooms (one pictured) including three in the main shed-styled house

The entire residence has six bathrooms (one pictured) including three in the main shed-styled house 

There are eight well-sized bedrooms across the entire property painted with different colours

There are eight well-sized bedrooms across the entire property painted with different colours

There is also a one-bedroom, one-bathroom studio flat with a kitchen (pictured) on the block

There is also a one-bedroom, one-bathroom studio flat with a kitchen (pictured) on the block

The original two-storey 1952 home was bought in 2010 for $455,000 and has three bedrooms and two bathrooms.

In 2014 and 2015 the owner built the giant two-level Colourbond shed-style house which has four bedrooms, including a 55.6sqm master with an ensuite.

The shed has three bathrooms, a cinema, entertainment room and a 1950s-themed living room with red leather couches and a traditional dining booth. 

Some of the furniture was bought off the iconic West Australian restaurant Jimmy Deans Diner and can be included in the sale of the home. 

There is also a standalone studio with a bedroom, bathroom and kitchen, plus two fully functional powered workshops that can fit trucks inside them. 

The property has two fully-functional powered workshops (one pictured) that can fit large trucks

The property has two fully-functional powered workshops (one pictured) that can fit large trucks 

The homes are set on a 7214m2 block off the Great Western Highway in Glen Forrest, WA

The homes are set on a 7214m2 block off the Great Western Highway in Glen Forrest, WA

The floor plan of the homes (pictured) shows there are three to four standalone living spaces

The floor plan of the homes (pictured) shows there are three to four standalone living spaces

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Tattoos, goonbags and LOTS of mullets: Incredible photos of Australian sheep shearers

From blue singlet and Akubras to tatts and trendy mullets: Incredible photos of Australian shearers shows how edgy those holding up iconic sheep industries look in 2021

  • Photography exhibition captures the larrikins who make up the weird and wonderful world of sheep shearing
  • Wheatbelt snapper Leith Alexander took about 20,000 pictures as she travelled across Western Australia
  • The 34-year-old captured the tattoos, mullets and hard-working lifestyle of the mostly ‘invisible industry’ 

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The heavily tattooed, hard-working lifestyle of young Australian sheep shearers has been poignantly captured in a stunning photography exhibition called ‘Shear’.

Wheatbelt photographer Leith Alexander has uncovered a hidden world of mullets and wool that most city-slickers hardly ever get to see.

The 34-year-old former Sydneysider told Daily Mail Australia she took about 20,000 photos while travelling across farms and sheep stations in Western Australia, revealing the everyday life of the ‘invisible industry’.

The heavily tattooed, hard-drinking lifestyle of young Australian sheep shearers has been poignantly captured in a stunning photography exhibition called Shear

'Shearing is a whole sub-culture of its own, specific to the country. It’s a mix of old school and new,' Ms Alexander said

‘Shearing is a whole sub-culture of its own, specific to the country. It’s a mix of old school and new,’ Ms Alexander said

‘Shearing is the hardest physical job in the world,’ she said.

‘But my city friends have no idea how or what shearing even looks like.  

‘They didn’t know anything about it apart from the basics that there are people who take the wool off.’ 

Australia’s wool industry began in the 1820s and boomed right through to the 1960s, remaining one of the country’s most profitable sectors throughout the great depression, two World Wars and recurring drought.

Leith Alexander took about 20,000 photos while travelling across farms and sheep stations in Western Australian to revealing the everyday life of the 'invisible industry'

Leith Alexander took about 20,000 photos while travelling across farms and sheep stations in Western Australian to revealing the everyday life of the ‘invisible industry’

A historic photo from the Library of Victoria taken in the 1800s shows what Australian sheep shearers used to look like

A historic photo from the Library of Victoria taken in the 1800s shows what Australian sheep shearers used to look like

Although Australia no longer ‘rides on the sheep’s back’ the industry has remained lucrative for those in the business and is still a beacon for roustabouts and weird and wonderful characters.

‘Shearing is a whole sub-culture of its own, specific to the country. It’s a mix of old school and new,’ Ms Alexander said.

‘It’s a job that’s been around for a hundred years and its barely changed, but then there are all these modern young people going into the industry with mullets and mohawks and tatts.  

‘It’s a look that reminds me of city crust punks but in these iconically Australian backdrops.’

'It's a job that's been around for a hundred years and its barely changed, but then there are all these modern young people going into the industry with mullets and mohawks and tatts,' Ms Alexander said

‘It’s a job that’s been around for a hundred years and its barely changed, but then there are all these modern young people going into the industry with mullets and mohawks and tatts,’ Ms Alexander said

Wheatbelt snapper Leith Alexander (pictured centre) uncovered a hidden world of mullets and wool that most city-slickers hardly ever get to see

Wheatbelt snapper Leith Alexander (pictured centre) uncovered a hidden world of mullets and wool that most city-slickers hardly ever get to see

She hopes her Shear exhibition, featuring 21 photos, will help raise the profile of the industry and shed some light on hoards of larrikins who flock to it.

The images will be shown in Perth until June 20 and in Narrogin, about 200km south-east of Perth, until May 8.

Ms Alexander has also been selected as one of the 80 finalists for the The Living Memory: National Photographic Portrait Prize, at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra.

The exhibition showcases photos that reveal the upheaval caused in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

The incredible images will be shown in Perth until June 20 and in Narrogin, about 200km south-east of Perth until May 8

The incredible images will be shown in Perth until June 20 and in Narrogin, about 200km south-east of Perth until May 8

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Coles, Woolworths, Bunnings and Kmart opening times Anzac Day weekend 

Many supermarkets will not open until after 1pm on Sunday across the country.

The Anzac Day public holiday is only observed in SA, WA, ACT and Qld. People in those states and territories will also experience store closures  on Monday April 26.

WOOLWORTHS

Sunday: Many Woolworths stores will be closed or have restricted hours on Sunday, but customers are encouraged to visit the Woolworths website to check the opening hours of their local store.

Most stores in NSW, ACT and Vic will be open from 1pm, from midday in SA, and from 12.30pm in Tasmania.

Stores in WA and Qld will be closed. 

Monday: Woolworths encourages customers to check opening hours in their local store by visiting their website.

COLES 

Sunday: Coles stores will open from 1pm in NSW, ACT, Victoria, from midday in NT, and at 12.30pm in Tasmania.

All metro stores in Queensland will be closed for the day, but will vary in regional areas.

Most stores in SA will be open from midday, and metro stores in WA will be closed but will vary in regional areas.

Monday: Stores in NSW, ACT, Victoria and Tasmania will have normal trading hours.

Opening times for supermarkets in regional WA will vary and customers are encouraged to check the Coles website, but metro stores will be open from 8pm-6pm.

In SA, CBD stores will be open from 11am-5pm and metro stores will be closed.

Supermarkets in NT will b open from 8am-8pm, and from 8am-9pm in Alice Springs.

BUNNINGS 

Sunday: Stores will be open in NSW, Victoria, WA, SA and NT, with customers encouraged to check the website for local store trading hours.

Bunnings will be open from 1pm-7pm in ACT, and from 12.30pm-6pm in Tasmania.

All stores will be closed in Qld.

Monday: Stores in all states will be open, but customers should check the website for the trading hours of their local store. 

KMART  

Sunday: Stores will open in NSW and ACT from 1.30pm. All stores in Tasmania and Victoria will open at 1pm, except Albury which will open at 1.30pm.

In WA, only stores in South Hedland, Karratha, Broome, Albany, Eaton Fair, Busselton will open from 1pm.

SA residents in Mount Barker, Port Lincoln, Victor Harbour, Murray Bridge, Port Pirie, Rundle Mall, Whyalla, Berri, and Port Augusta can visit Kmart from 1pm, while people in Mount Gambier can go from 12pm.

In the NT, Darwin and Coolalinga shops will be open from 1pm-7pm, while people in Alice Springs and Katherine can go to Kmart from 1pm-6pm. 

Queensland stores will be closed. 

Monday: Stores in all states will be open, but customers should check the website for details on their local store.