Eight divine UK B&Bs set amid glorious gardens from the Highlands to Somerset

We’re lucky to have some of the finest gardens in the world, from national treasures such as Kew, Sissinghurst and Wisley to the thousands of smaller private gardens open for charity.

Many of them do so under the National Garden Scheme, which raises money for good causes in England and Wales through garden openings, plant sales and teas — its president is none other than the queen of cakes herself, Dame Mary Berry. There is also a Scottish version, Scotland’s Gardens Scheme.

A number of these ‘open gardens’ properties also offer B&B or self-catering accommodation, allowing the chance to revel in some of the most spectacular gardens in the country. Here is our pick of the places to stay to delight any garden lover.

LOVELY LINCS

The Easton estate in Lincolnshire has a pair of stone cottages, The Gatehouse and May Lodge, as well as smaller Loft suites

The Easton estate properties have been lovingly restored

The Easton estate properties have been lovingly restored

The historic Easton estate, in the heart of Lincolnshire, has a pair of beautifully fitted-out stone cottages, The Gatehouse and May Lodge, as well as smaller Loft suites. The properties, which each sleep two, are on the edge of the renowned 12-acre garden, lovingly restored over the past 20 years. Guests have access to the garden at any time.

Don’t miss: Wandering among the roses, sweet peas and two acres of wildflower meadows before breakfast, or sitting in the garden at night and stargazing.

How to do it: Cottages from £650 a week, or from £400 for two nights; the Lofts from £150 for two nights (eastonholidaycottages.co.uk).

FARM CHARM

A 470-acre working farm, Greenwick Farm near York has sweeping views across the Wolds. The Victorian farmhouse B&B has three double bedrooms, or guests can stay in two nearby eco-pods with bathrooms and kitchenettes. There is unrestricted access to the quiet one-acre garden, developed from disused farmland. Guests can enjoy the terrace, a large dell with mature trees, flower borders, a stumpery and the water feature.

Don’t miss: Enjoying an evening drink while taking in the glorious views from the garden towards a wooded valley teeming with birdlife.

How to do it: B&B from £100 a night, or a pod from £85 (greenwickfarm.co.uk).

STATELY SPLENDOUR

Arley Hall (pictured) near Northwich in Cheshire offers a smartly furnished cottage, Chapel House, which sleeps four

Arley Hall (pictured) near Northwich in Cheshire offers a smartly furnished cottage, Chapel House, which sleeps four

Dating back more than 250 years, the superb, flower-filled garden at Arley Hall near Northwich in Cheshire covers eight acres. One of the locations for the TV show Peaky Blinders, Arley offers a smartly furnished cottage, Chapel House, which sleeps four. It’s just a few steps from the cottage to the garden, and guests get free entry to it between 10am and 5pm. There’s also an excellent tearoom.

Don’t miss: The huge double herbaceous borders, a tapestry of colourful blooms set against immaculately clipped yew hedges.

How to do it: A week from £533 to £1,100 (ruralretreats.co.uk).

DREAM COTTAGE

Hideaway Loft at Laversdale in Cumbria is a charming thatched cottage sleeping two. The cottage sits within the garden, surrounded by abundant flowers, arches, grottoes and a rill, with plenty of seats dotted around from which to admire the countryside. Guests have their own seating area with a barbecue by the cottage, but are welcome to use the rest of the garden.

Don’t miss: Magnificent views across the Lake District, the Pennines and the hills of the Scottish Borders.

How to do it: Hideaway Loft from £90 a night or £504 for a week (hideawayloft.co.uk).

WONDERFUL WALES

On the High Glanau Manor estate in Gwent there is a stylishly furnished stone cottage sleeping two (pictured)

On the High Glanau Manor estate in Gwent there is a stylishly furnished stone cottage sleeping two (pictured)

High Glanau Manor near Monmouth in Gwent, an Arts and Crafts garden laid out in 1922, is full of period charm, with an Edwardian glasshouse, stone terraces and pergolas. In late spring, visitors can enjoy the rhododendrons and azaleas, while in the summer expect flower-packed borders and an orchard filled with wildflowers. Nestling in the 12-acre plot is The Garden House, a stylishly furnished self-catering stone cottage sleeping two.

Don’t miss: Watching the sun set over the Vale of Usk towards Sugar Loaf and the Brecon Beacons.

How to do it: From £125 a night (airbnb.co.uk).

CIDER WITH COSY

Cider Barrel Cottage in Somerset is a former cider store that is now an inviting two-bedroom house

Cider Barrel Cottage in Somerset is a former cider store that is now an inviting two-bedroom house

Cider Barrel Cottage, a former cider store near Cheddar in Somerset, has been turned into a comfortable two-bedroom house with a conservatory.

The cottage is in a large, lush garden with sweeping lawns, a brook, pergolas, arbours and an impressive collection of trees, shrubs and perennial plants. Guests can access the garden at any time, and also explore the four and a half acres of working cider apple orchards. Owner Kathy Longhurst likes visitors to go home with a cutting or two from the garden.

Don’t miss: Micro pigs Raquel and Cassandra.

How to do it: From £460 to £600 a week; but fully booked until late August (ciderbarrelcottage.co.uk).

GRAPES GALORE 

Established in 1980, Coddington Vineyard near Ledbury in Herefordshire has two acres of vines, plus a fine garden with waterside planting, a wildlife meadow, woodland, roses and flower borders.

Guests can use the garden or wander through the vineyards, or explore the threshing barn and cider mill. You stay in the newly-renovated Hop Cottage, a two-bedroom, Grade II-listed cottage ideal for families, or in the Vine Lodge log cabin, which sleeps two and is located in the vineyard.

Don’t miss: Tasting the estate’s wine, sparkling wine, apple juice and ice cream.

How to do it: From £160 a night (coddingtonvineyard.co.uk).

HIGHLAND HEAVEN 

Guests who stay at Gordon Castle in the Highlands are free to access the huge Walled Garden during the daytime

Guests who stay at Gordon Castle in the Highlands are free to access the huge Walled Garden during the daytime

One of the most Instagrammed gardens in the country, the huge Walled Garden at Gordon Castle in the Highlands brims with flowers, fruit, herbs, vegetables and 3,000 lavender plants. Guests, who are free to access the garden during the daytime, stay at one of five self-catering properties: the Garden House sleeping eight; the Kennel Cottage, for six; the Courtyard Cottage and the Lakeside Cottage, each for four; and Quarry Gardens Lodge, for two.

Don’t miss: Sampling the gin, jams and chutneys — plus toiletries made from garden herbs.

How to do it: From £629 to £861 for smaller properties, £1,151-£1,799 for the largest (gordoncastle.co.uk).

Dowden reinforces Government’s commitment to Online Harms Bill during visit to League One Charlton

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden reinforces Government’s commitment to Online Harms Bill during visit to League One club Charlton

  • Dowden reinforced commitment to introducing the Online Harms Bill 
  • He met members of Charlton’s men and women’s squad and staff on Tuesday 
  • English football has been rocked by an alarming increase in online abuse 

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden reinforced the Government’s commitment to introducing the Online Harms Bill during a low-key visit to League One club Charlton on Tuesday.

The new legislation, which will make social media firms such as Twitter and Instagram accountable for content on their platforms, was officially unveiled in the Queen’s Speech with Whitehall aiming to have the law enforceable by the end of the year.

In recent months English football has been rocked by an alarming increase in sickening cases of online abuse directed at footballers on their social media accounts.

New legislation will make social media firms accountable for content on their platforms 

And Dowden, the secretary for Culture, Media and Sport, met members of Charlton’s men and women’s squad and staff on Tuesday to update them on the forthcoming law changes, which should significantly reduce examples of online hate.

Dowden spoke personally to manager Nigel Adkins and first team coach Jason Euell to emphasise the Government’s determination to ensure the new legislation is passed through Parliament as quickly as possible.

The MP also personally praised Charlton for their community and equality, diversity and inclusion work.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden met members of Charlton players and staff on Tuesday

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden met members of Charlton players and staff on Tuesday

Sportsmail understands chair of the FA’s inclusion advisory board Paul Elliott, who started his career at Charlton, facilitated Dowden’s visit to the south London club.

Elliott, who was also at Charlton, has been working closely with FA chief executive Mark Bullingham in the governing body’s fight against online hate and discrimination within English football.

Anti-racism organisation Kick It Out has welcomed the announcement of the Online Harms Bill in the Queen’s Speech.

English football has been rocked by an alarming increase of online abuse directed at players

English football has been rocked by an alarming increase of online abuse directed at players 

‘We are calling for it to be enacted in legislation as soon as possible,’ read a statement.

‘Social media companies must be held to account for protecting their users. It is therefore vital that any legislative and regulatory frameworks are robust and effective in requiring social media companies to do more to prevent, detect and remove discriminatory abuse from their platforms.

‘This opportunity must be seized to ensure that individuals and communities are protected from toxic online abuse.’

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Princess Charlotte, six, looks the spitting image of her great-grandmother the Queen

Royal enthusiasts have gone wild over Princess Charlotte’s striking resemblance to her great-grandmother, the Queen.

A photograph of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s daughter, who turns six today, was released by Kensington Palace to mark the occasion.

Princess Charlotte appears happy and relaxed in a floral summer dress, with her long hair loose and tousled in the picture, taken this weekend in Norfolk, by her mother Kate.

Delighted royal fans rushed to point out the family resemblances, noting how similar Princess Charlotte often looks to her great-grandmother, the Queen. 

Princess Elizabeth aged six, in a ballet outfit

Royal enthusiasts have gone wild over Princess Charlotte’s (pictured left, aged six) striking resemblance to her great-grandmother, the Queen (pictured right, aged six)

Delighted royal fans rushed to point out the family resemblances in Princess Charlotte's new portrait, noting how similar the young royal (pictured in a photo released to mark her first birthday) often looks to her great-grandmother, the Queen

The Queen at eight-months-old

Delighted royal fans rushed to point out the family resemblances in Princess Charlotte’s new portrait, noting how similar the young royal (pictured left, in a photo released to mark her first birthday) often looks to her great-grandmother, the Queen (pictured right, when eight-months-old)

One person wrote on Twitter: ‘I’ve always said I see so much of Her Majesty, The Queen, in little Princess Charlotte. She’s got the Queen’s eyes!’

Another wrote: ‘She really is a Windsor! Such a gorgeous girl!’, while a third added: ‘I’ve always thought Princess Charlotte was a mix of the Queen and Prince William.’

The new photo shows the smiling princess pictured outdoors while wearing a dark blue short sleeved £59 dress with a pink floral design from British children’s clothing brand Rachel Riley.

Royal fans compared the portrait to one of the Queen, then Princess Elizabeth, when aged six, showcasing Princess Charlotte’s uncanny resemblance to her great-grandmother. 

In a portrait released of the Queen when at the same age of her great-granddaughter, Her Majesty can be seen sporting the same charming smile.

Princess Charlotte, aged two

Her great-grandmother the Queen at the same age

Princess Charlotte, aged two, pictured left, while pictured right, is her great-grandmother the Queen at the same age in 1928

A handout photo, pictured, released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge showing Princess Charlotte, aged three, with her brother Prince Louis in a pictured taken by her mother at Kensington Palace in London

The Queen aged three or four, pictured

A handout photo, pictured left, released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge showing Princess Charlotte, aged three, with her brother Prince Louis in a pictured taken by her mother at Kensington Palace in London. Pictured right, The Queen aged three or four

The young Princess Elizabeth wore a stylish headband and ruffled ballet dress in the photograph.

But it’s not just this year’s portrait where the similar features can be spotted, with photographs of Princess Charlotte and the Queen when at the same age repeatedly showing their likeness.

For instance, when aged four, a picture of Princess Charlotte showed the young royal holding a flower as she ran through a field, similar to a snap of her great-grandmother at that age.

A young Princess Elizabeth was photographed playing in a field of flowers on June 3, 1930, when also aged four. 

When aged four, a picture of Princess Charlotte showed the young royal holding a flower as she ran through a field, similar to a snap of her great-grandmother at that age

A young Princess Elizabeth was photographed playing in a field of flowers on June 3, 1930, when also aged four

When aged four, a picture of Princess Charlotte (seen left) showed the young royal holding a flower as she ran through a field, similar to a snap of her great-grandmother at that age (seen right)

Princess Charlotte, aged five, pictured

The then Princess Elizabeth in 1931 aged five with her younger sister, Princess Margaret

Princess Charlotte, aged five, pictured left. Pictured right: The then Princess Elizabeth in 1931 aged five with her younger sister, Princess Margaret

Although Princess Charlotte’s parents have always fiercely protected their children’s privacy, restricting the number of photocalls they take part in each year for instance, they have been more relaxed of late. 

During lockdown, they shared their experiences of homeschooling, with Prince William admitting it was ‘a bit of a nightmare’ and joking that he struggled with Year 2 maths.

Along with her brothers, Princess Charlotte was pictured clapping for carers during the first lockdown and delivering packages of homemade pasta to isolated pensioners on the Sandringham Estate.

The Queen, then Princess Elizabeth, pictured around the age of six. Although Princess Charlotte's parents have always fiercely protected their children’s privacy, restricting the number of photocalls they take part in each year for instance, they have been more relaxed of late

The Queen, then Princess Elizabeth, pictured around the age of six. Although Princess Charlotte’s parents have always fiercely protected their children’s privacy, restricting the number of photocalls they take part in each year for instance, they have been more relaxed of late

Princess Elizabeth (to become Queen Elizabeth II) with her mother and father in the late 1930s

The Queen with her sister Princess Margaret as children in the 'grounds' of the model house - Y Bwthyn Bach - presented to them on Elizabeth's sixth birthday by the people of Wales in 1933

Princess Elizabeth (to become Queen Elizabeth II) with her mother and father in the late 1930s (left) and with her sister Princess Margaret as children in the ‘grounds’ of the model house – Y Bwthyn Bach – presented to them on Elizabeth’s sixth birthday by the people of Wales in 1933

Reaction: Royal enthusiasts took to Twitter today to comment on how much Princess Charlotte looks like her great-grandmother the Queen

Reaction: Royal enthusiasts took to Twitter today to comment on how much Princess Charlotte looks like her great-grandmother the Queen

In a video with David Attenborough, Princess Charlotte was heard declaring: ‘I like spiders. Do you like spiders too?’

The new photograph follows the release of a video of Princess Charlotte with her brothers, Prince George, seven, and Prince Louis, three, and their parents to mark the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s 10th wedding anniversary last week. 

It showed the family enjoying time outdoors at their Norfolk residence Anmer Hall and on sand dunes at a nearby beach. 

In the video, Princess Charlotte was seen playing and toasting a marshmallow on a camp fire.