Vaccinated Australians may be able to go overseas with home quarantine

Vaccinated Australians may be able to go overseas and home quarantine when they return before the border full opens in mid-2022

Vaccinated Australians may be able to go overseas and home quarantine when they get back, according to plans being worked on by Scott Morrison.

The federal budget assumes Australia’s borders will not open until mid-2022, but the prime minister said there could be a chance for holidays before then.

He has tasked the medical experts with finding out if it’s safe to reduce hotel quarantine requirements for vaccinated Aussies. 

Vaccinated Australians may be able to go overseas and home quarantine when they get back, according to plans being worked on by Scott Morrison

‘I’ve been seeking to get support for Australians who are vaccinated would be able to travel overseas and return in some sort of modified quarantine arrangement,’ he told radio 2GB. 

‘I’ve been seeking that for some time, but that also has to be done safely. These are all of the options that we need to work practically on.’

Mr Morrison did not say if the ‘modified’ arrangement meant home quarantine or reduced hotel quarantine. 

‘Borders is just not a binary option of open one day, shut the next. There are various grades of that and that’s actually what the Budget assumes,’ he added. 

‘So that they need to be practical, they need to be safe, they need to ensure that we don’t put at risk the great gains that have been made.’

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Scott Morrison reveals what he was REALLY doing while allegedly holding $5000-a-seat fundraisers

Scott Morrison reveals what he was REALLY doing when he was accused of holding $5000-a-seat fundraisers by a Labor leader

  • Scott Morrison has addressed allegations he held a $5000-per-head event  
  • Steven Miles was speaking at Labor Day event in Brisbane on Monday afternoon 
  • He said the Prime Minister was hosting an exorbitant dinner at the same time 
  • Appearing on Sunrise, Mr Morrison said the dinner in question was impossible
  • The nation’s leader said he was watching Shrek with his daughter on Monday 

Scott Morrison has revealed he could not have possibly held the $5000-per head event a Labor leader accused him of earlier this week. 

Queensland Labor MP Steven Miles was speaking at a free Labor Day event in Brisbane on Monday afternoon when he alleged Mr Morrison was holding an exorbitant dinner at the same time. 

‘Scott Morrison’s in town, he’s holding $5000-a-seat fundraisers, think about that,’ Mr Miles said at the event. 

Appearing on Sunrise on Tuesday morning, the Prime Minister addressed the allegations levelled against him by Mr Miles, claiming he was actually at home during the time in question. 

‘I was at home watching Shrek the musical with my daughter. There were no events that night,’ Mr Morrison said. 

Scott Morrison addressed allegations he held $5000-a-seat events during an appearance on Sunrise on Tuesday morning (pictured)

‘He can’t even get that right.’ 

During the speech, Mr Miles dropped the c-word when talking about the Prime Minister, later blaming his stutter for the mishap. 

‘Albo’s here with us at Labour Day while Scott Morrison’s charging $5000 a head to have dinner with him.

‘What a cun… contrast.’

When asked by host David Koch whether he was insulted by Mr Miles comments or if he believed the excuse, the Prime Minister said he had brushed it off. 

‘This bloke’s got a bit of form, I’ll let him defend his own thing. He should step up to the responsibility of his position.’

Queensland Labor MP Steven Miles was speaking at a Labor Day event in Brisbane on Monday afternoon comparing PM Scott Morrison with Labor Leader Anthony Albanese

Miles blamed his slip of the tongue on his stutter, saying he would 'never ever speak like that'

Queensland Labor MP Steven Miles was speaking at a Labor Day event in Brisbane on Monday afternoon comparing PM Scott Morrison with Labor Leader Anthony Albanese

In his speech, Mr Miles compared Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese, who was in attendance at the free event, to Morrison’s ritzy dinner.

The MP, who grinned and laughed as the crowd roared with laughter and cheered at the slip of the tongue, then introduced Albanese who he said would be more careful with his words. 

At a press conference following the event, Mr Miles said the gaffe was the result of his stutter rather than a shot at the PM.

‘I understand I might have stuttered while speaking earlier and some in the crowd might have misheard,’ he said. 

‘What I said I want to be very, very clear that I was using the word contrast, the word contrast.’

The 43-year-old, who took over from Jackie Trad as deputy premier last year, said that despite his disagreements with Morrison’s policies, he would ‘never ever use language like that’. 

‘I understand that was a slight stutter and people might have misheard me but it certainly wasn’t my intention.’ 

Miles, who grinned and laughed as the crowd roared with laughter and cheered at the slip of the tongue, then introduced Albanese who he said would be more careful with his words

Miles, who grinned and laughed as the crowd roared with laughter and cheered at the slip of the tongue, then introduced Albanese who he said would be more careful with his words

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Scott Morrison asks for urgent review into the Chinese-owned Port of Darwin agreement

Scott Morrison asks for urgent review into the Chinese-owned Port of Darwin agreement – as national security experts warn the controversial agreement is a ‘strategic own goal’

Scott Morrison has asked for an urgent review into the Chinese-owned Port of Darwin agreement, as national security experts warn the deal is a ‘strategic own goal’.

The Department of Defence will determine whether Chinese company Landbridge should cease ownership of the Northern Territory port on national security grounds.

The deal, which was signed six years ago and involves the 99-year-lease of the Port of Darwin, has been questioned by federal opposition and national security experts. 

Pictured: The Royal Caribbean ship Legend of the Seas docked at Port of Darwin

Defence Minister Peter Dutton confirmed his department was going to ‘come back with some advice’ after the probe was requested by the National Security Committee of Cabinet, The Sydney Morning Herald reported. 

Landbridge is owned by Chinese billionaire Ye Cheng. 

Last week, the prime minister suggested his government would take action if he was advised to by the department. 

‘If there is any advice that I receive from the Department of Defence or intelligence agencies that suggest that there are national security risks there then you’d expect the government to take action on that, and that would be right,’ Mr Morrison said.  

Director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s defence program, Michael Shoebridge said he wondered whether operating the port is in the ‘company’s commercial interests’ amid ‘the strategic environment they find themselves’. 

‘I think it’s obvious that if the Darwin port lease was being considered today, the result would not be to lease it to a Chinese-owned company for 99 years,’ he said. 

‘It seems a strategic own goal for one of the best parts of Darwin harbour to be in the control of a Chinese-owned operator.’ 

The $506 million agreement with Landbridge was signed by the NT government back in 2015.

It gives Landbridge complete operational control of the port, as well as 80 per cent of ownership of the land and facilities at East Arm wharf.

More to come 

Scott Morrison has asked for an urgent review into the Chinese-owned Port of Darwin agreement

Scott Morrison has asked for an urgent review into the Chinese-owned Port of Darwin agreement

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