Senator Mitt Romney is BOOED by delegates at the Utah GOP convention for voting to impeach Trump

Senator Mitt Romney is BOOED by delegates at the Utah GOP convention for voting to impeach Trump and narrowly avoid his own CENSURE for going rogue

  • Senator Mitt Romney was booed on Saturday as he made a speech at the Utah Republican Party’s organizing convention
  • The 2,000-strong crowd jeered after Romney, a frequent critic of former President Trump suggested that he wasn’t a fan of Trump’s ‘character issues’
  • Romney has faced negative backlash and a censure threat by the GOP delegation for his votes to impeach Donald Trump earlier this year

More than two thousand Utah Republicans booed Senator Mitt Romney as he arrived to speak at a convention in his home state on Saturday.

The vocal backlash came after as a motion was put forward but ultimately rejected for him to be censurd for his votes at President Donald Trump´s impeachment trials.

‘Aren’t you embarrassed?’ said Romney in response to the catcalling as he walked onto the stage. 

Sen. Mitt Romney was booed as he addressed the Utah GOP convention on Saturday

Senator Mitt Romney addresses the Utah Republican Party 2021 Organizing Convention on Saturday in West Valley City, Utah

Senator Mitt Romney addresses the Utah Republican Party 2021 Organizing Convention on Saturday in West Valley City, Utah

‘I’m a man who says what he means, and you know I was not a fan of our last president’s character issues,’ he said.

Shouts of ‘traitor’ or ‘communist’ could be heard from the crowd. 

‘You can boo all you like,’ Romney continued. ‘I’ve been a Republican all of my life. My dad was the governor of Michigan and I was the Republican nominee for president in 2012.’

Romney managed to elicit a few cheers when he asked the crowd if they were fans of Biden.

More than two thousand Utah Republicans booed Senator Mitt Romney as he arrived to speak at a convention in his home state on Saturday

More than two thousand Utah Republicans booed Senator Mitt Romney as he arrived to speak at a convention in his home state on Saturday

The 2,000-strong crowd jeered after Romney, a frequent critic of former President Trump suggested that he wasn't a fan of Trump's 'character issues'

The 2,000-strong crowd jeered after Romney, a frequent critic of former President Trump suggested that he wasn’t a fan of Trump’s ‘character issues’ 

Romney has faced negative backlash and a censure threat by the GOP delegation for his votes to impeach Donald Trump earlier this year

Romney has faced negative backlash and a censure threat by the GOP delegation for his votes to impeach Donald Trump earlier this year 

‘So, what do you think about President Biden’s first 100 days?’ Romney asked. 

The motion for Romney to be censured narrowly failed, 798 to 711, in a vote by delegates to the state GOP convention.

At one stage, the Chairman of the Utah GOP, Derek Brown, interrupted Romney’s speech to tell the rowdy crowd to simmer down.   

Despite the negativity, Romney ended his speech on a positive note. 

‘We need to come together in strength and unity,’ he said.

Senator Mitt Romney walks off the stage after addressing the Utah Republican Party 2021 Organizing Convention on Saturday

Senator Mitt Romney walks off the stage after addressing the Utah Republican Party 2021 Organizing Convention on Saturday

Davis County delegate Don Guymon, who authored the resolution, said Romney’s votes to remove Trump from office ‘hurt the Constitution and hurt the party.’

‘This was a process driven by Democrats who hated Trump,’ Guymon said. ‘Romney’s vote in the first impeachment emboldened Democrats who continued to harass Trump.’

The proposal, among several platform changes debated Saturday, also sought to praise the other members of Utah’s congressional delegation for their support of the former president.

Others warned supporting the censure risked defining the party around Trump instead of the conservative principles most delegates treasure.

‘If the point of all this is to let Mitt Romney know we’re displeased with him, trust me, he knows,’ said Salt Lake County delegate Emily de Azavedo Brown. ‘Let´s not turn this into a Trump or no Trump thing. Are we a party of principle or a party of a person?’

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Democrat Rep. Cheri Bustos announces she won’t seek reelection in 2022 in Illinois

Democrat Rep. Cheri Bustos announces she won’t seek reelection in 2022 in Illinois district that is becoming more conservative and Trump won twice

  • She is one of seven Democrats representing districts carried by former President Donald Trump
  • Bustos was elected by just 4 percentage points in 2020
  • She helped Democrats’ political arm in year where they barely kept the House 
  • 2020 Republican opponent Esther Joy King said Bustos ‘destined to lose’ and announced she’ll run 

Five-term Democratic Rep. Cherri Bustos announced she won’t seek reelection in an Illinois district that former President Donald Trump carried in 2020.

Bustos, who as head of the Democratic campaign arm helped preside over the elections where Republicans won back seats even as Trump lost the White House, was facing yet another tight race. 

She defeated Republican Esther Joy King by just 52 to 48 per cent of the vote. King immediately announced she would once again vie for the seat.

Democratic Rep. Cheri Bustos of Illinois announced Friday she won’t be seeking reelection in her district, which has been becoming more Republican

Bustos, 59, had been considered a lawmaker with potential to move up in leadership.

‘It has been an honor to be a voice for our family farmers, working families, those struggling to afford healthcare and so many more,’ she said in a statement, referencing her central Illinois district.

‘Each time I traveled to Washington, I brought those voices with me to elevate our region and bring real and lasting change.’

Illinois will lose a seat through redistricting next year under the latest count released by the Census Bureau this week. In that scenario, it would have been challenging for Democrats to do much to try to boost her chances by moving more Democratic areas into the district. 

Democrats ‘didn’t have great options for shoring up Bustos’s district,’ wrote Dave Wasserman of the Cook Political Report.

She is the fourth House Democrat to forego reelection – a group that included other lawmakers facing potential defeat or redistricting challenges. 

'I wish her the best!': Republican Esther Joy King released a statement saying 'Cheri was destined to lose'

‘I wish her the best!’: Republican Esther Joy King released a statement saying ‘Cheri was destined to lose’

Her retirement gives Republicans an opportunity in an open-seat in an off-year election where the party in power traditionally loses seats, with Democrats holding a narrow majority.

In her own statement, the Republican, Esther Joy King, announced she was running again – while kicking Bustos on the way out the door.

‘I want to thank Cheri Bustos for her service and I wish her the best going forward. Cheri has always claimed she knew this district well – so she clearly saw what we’re seeing every day: IL-17 was going to make a change in 2022 and Cheri was destined to lose. The people of the IL-17th accomplished this! I’m proud to be part of a movement to bring better representation to the best people I know,’ she said.  

‘Cheri Bustos made the right decision to retire rather than face defeat in 2022, said National Republican Campaign spokesman Mike Berg.

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USPS admits it is spying on Americans by monitoring their social media – but won’t reveal details

USPS admits it is spying on Americans by monitoring their social media and is ‘working with other agencies’ – but won’t reveal details

Chief Postal Inspector Gary Barksdale briefing lawmakers on the Oversight Committee Wednesday where he admitted to the USPS legal arm spying on Americans’ social media

The U.S. Postal Service admitted during a Wednesday meeting to spying on citizens with its law enforcement arm, claiming it worked with other agencies to track Americans’ social media posts.

Chief Postal Inspector Gary Barksdale briefed lawmakers on the Oversight Committee regarding the program known as iCOP, or Internet Covert Operations Program, but could not provide a date for when it was initiated.

‘The Chief Postal Inspector was wildly unprepared for this briefing,’ GOP Representative Nancy Mace of South Carolina told DailyMail.com following the meeting with Barksdale.

The inspector was called for a briefing after iCOP was first made public in a report last week.

Yahoo obtained and published documents related to iCOP, which includes an operation where analysts page through social media sites to look for ‘inflammatory’ posts, including messages about planned protests.

Mace said Barksdale revealed the program has not led to any arrests thought it’s still unclear how long it has been operating. 

‘Analysts with the United States Postal Inspection Service (USPIS) Internet Covert Operations Program (iCOP) monitored significant activity regarding planned protests occurring internationally and domestically on March 20, 2021,’ a March 16 government bulletin, marked as ‘law enforcement sensitive’, reads. 

In a government bulletin, distributed through the DHS's fusion centers, it details that the Internet Covert Operations Program (iCOP) analyzes social media sites for 'inflammatory' posts, including messages about planned protests

 In a government bulletin, distributed through the DHS’s fusion centers, it details that the Internet Covert Operations Program (iCOP) analyzes social media sites for ‘inflammatory’ posts, including messages about planned protests

It includes screenshots of posts from Facebook, Parler, Telegram and other social media sites about protests

It includes screenshots of posts from Facebook, Parler, Telegram and other social media sites about protests

‘Locations and times have been identified for these protests, which are being distributed online across multiple social media platforms, to include right-wing leaning Parler and Telegram accounts,’ it continues, but later notes: ‘No intelligence is available to suggest the legitimacy of these threats.’

Barksdale told the Oversight Committee that while the operation would continue, they would put an end to the bulletin.

The bulletin, distributed through the Department of Homeland Security’s fusion centers, includes screenshots of posts from Facebook, Parler, Telegram and other social media sites about the protests.

It does not appear any of the posts from the bulletin, including one from an alleged Proud Boy, contain any threatening language.

Individuals, who were mentioned by name and other identifying information.

Former President Donald Trump and his allies continue to push claims of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election – specifically in relation to the mass amounts of mail-in ballots due to increased remote voting during the coronavirus pandemic.

Rep. Mace, who serves on the House Oversight and Reform Committee, revealed that Barksdale claims iCOP isn’t a real ‘program’ at USPS because it’s ‘incident-related’ not an ongoing matter, but the social media operation is being overseen by an ‘executive.’

Barksdale also said he doesn’t know how much money is being allocated for the spying initiative, Mace said, and would not say during the briefing which agencies are coordinating with USPS.

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Trump’s support falls among Republicans

Trump’s support falls among Republicans with 50 per cent now saying they support the party OVER the ex-president

  • President Donald Trump’s grip on the Republican Party seems to be loosening, new polling shows 
  • A national NBC News poll found that for the first time ever, 50 per cent of Republicans say they’re supporters of the GOP over Trump
  • Another 44 per cent of Republicans say they consider themselves to be Trump supporters over Republican Party supporters 
  • The poll marks the first time since July 2019 that party supporters outnumber Trump supporters 
  • It’s also the first time the 50 per cent threshold has been met when Republicans were asked about their allegiances  

President Donald Trump’s grip on the Republican Party seems to be loosening, new polling shows, as the ex-president has been out of office for nearly 100 days. 

A national NBC News poll found that for the first time ever, 50 per cent of Republicans say they’re supporters of the GOP over Trump, versus the 44 per cent who say they support Trump over the GOP.  

The poll marks the first time since July 2019 that party supporters outnumber Trump supporters and the only time the 50 per cent threshold has been met when Republicans were asked about their allegiances. 

Former President Donald Trump seems to be losing his grip on the Republican Party, as 50 per cent of Republicans say they view themselves as supporters of the party over the former president 

A year ago, 54 per cent of Republicans viewed themselves as supporters of Trump over the GOP, while 35 per cent chose the Republican Party over the sitting president.  

Among all adults, Trump’s numbers are slipping too. 

In the new poll, which was conducted April 17 through 20, 32 per cent of respondents viewed Trump favorably, versus 55 per cent who viewed him unfavorably.  

Breaking those numbers down, 21 per cent said they viewed Trump very favorably, while 47 per cent said they viewed him very unfavorably.  

The percentage of people who view the ex-president favorably have dropped since before the November 3 election. 

In the run-up to the election, 43 per cent of U.S. adults viewed Trump favorably versus 52 per cent who viewed him unfavorably.   

And then in January, 40 per cent viewed the outgoing president favorably, versus 53 per cent who viewed him unfavorably. 

President Joe Biden, on the other hand, is viewed favorably by 50 per cent of American adults, according to the latest poll, versus 36 per cent who view him negatively. 

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