Oklahoma boys are removed from class for wearing BLM t-shirts because ‘politics is banned’

Oklahoma boys, eight and five, are removed from class for wearing Black Lives Matter t-shirts: Mother is told ‘politics is banned from schools’ since George Floyd case

  • Boys were made to sit in the school’s offices for the rest of the day over the shirts
  • Mother Jordan Herbert challenged the decision as it is not official school policy
  • Third child, 12, was the only one not asked to leave class on account of his shirt 

Two Oklahoma boys, eight and five, were removed from class for wearing Black Lives Matter t-shirts after their mother was told politics is banned from schools since the George Floyd case. 

Mother Jordan Herbert said her sons Bentlee and Rodney, who attend different schools in Ardmore, were both removed from class and made to sit in the school’s offices for the rest of the day because of their t-shirts last Tuesday. 

Her third child, 12-year-old Jaleon, a student at Ardmore Middle School, was the only one not asked to leave to class on account of his t-shirt.  

Two Oklahoma boys, Bentlee (left) and Rodney (center), were removed from class for wearing Black Lives Matter t-shirts after their mother was told politics is banned from schools since the George Floyd case. Their brother Jaleon (right) was not removed on account of his t-shirt

Mother Jordan Herbert (pictured) said her sons Bentlee and Rodney, who attend different schools in Ardmore, were both removed from class and made to sit in the school's offices for the rest of the day because of their t-shirts last Tuesday

Mother Jordan Herbert (pictured) said her sons Bentlee and Rodney, who attend different schools in Ardmore, were both removed from class and made to sit in the school’s offices for the rest of the day because of their t-shirts last Tuesday

Speaking to the New York Times, Herbert said her middle child, Bentlee, had worn a BLM shirt to Charles Evans Elementary on April 30 and been forced to turn it inside out because he was not permitted to wear a political message. 

Herbert said she visited the school principal after the incident and queried which part of the dress code Bentlee had breached. 

She was directed to Ardmore City Schools Superintendent Kim Holland who reportedly told her after ‘the George Floyd case blew up, politics will not be allowed at school.’

When she pressed further, however, Holland told Herbert the school would not be able to take further action against her son if he continued to wear BLM-emblazoned clothes because it was not against official school policy.  

The district’s student handbook states clothes with ‘sayings or logos’ should be ‘in good taste and school appropriate’. 

The policy says ‘clothing or apparel that disrupts the learning process is prohibited’, but does not specifically ban clothes which are deemed political. 

Instead, the handbook states the school principal has the final say in ‘any question referring to the appropriateness of dress’.

Holland later told the Daily Ardmoreite: ‘It’s our interpretation of not creating a disturbance in school. I don’t want my kids wearing MAGA hats or Trump shirts to school either because it just creates, in this emotionally charged environment, anxiety and issues that I don’t want our kids to deal with’.

Mid-morning, she received a call from Rodney's school, Will Rogers Elementary (pictured), telling her the five-year-old would be removed from class unless she brought him another t-shirt

Mid-morning, she received a call from Rodney’s school, Will Rogers Elementary (pictured), telling her the five-year-old would be removed from class unless she brought him another t-shirt

Herbert sent her three children to their schools wearing BLM t-shirts emblazoned with an image of a clenched fist on Tuesday

Herbert sent her three children to their schools wearing BLM t-shirts emblazoned with an image of a clenched fist on Tuesday

Herbert told the Times she repeatedly voiced concerns BLM shirts were considered political, telling the paper ‘I told Mr Holland a Black Lives Matter t-shirt is not politics. I don’t see it disrupting anything’.

On Tuesday, Herbert sent the trio to their schools wearing BLM t-shirts emblazoned with an image of a clenched fist. 

Mid-morning, she received a call from Rodney’s school, Will Rogers Elementary, telling her the five-year-old would be removed from class unless she brought him another t-shirt. 

Herbert refused to allow Rodney to change shirts. 

She later learned Bentlee had similarly been excluded from class for the day because he was wearing a BLM t-shirt. 

The incident has sparked a backlash across Oklahoma and prompted the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) to pen a letter arguing barring BLM shirts from schools breaches student’s First Amendment rights. 

She later learned Bentlee, a student at Charles Evans Elementary School (pictured) had similarly been excluded from class for the day because he was wearing a BLM t-shirt

She later learned Bentlee, a student at Charles Evans Elementary School (pictured) had similarly been excluded from class for the day because he was wearing a BLM t-shirt

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‘Gargantuan’ hailstone measuring more than six inches across sets Texas record

A gigantic six and a half inch hailstone fell amid a blitz of destructive storms that laid waste to parts of Texas and Oklahoma this week.

The hailstone had meteorologists scrambling for the record books,  and is believed to be the largest ever to fall in the Lone Star State.

The stone was captured and photographed beside a US quarter for scale by Lino Ramirez, a resident of Hondo, about 40 miles west of San Antonio.

Ramirez shared the picture on social media, and it was examined by Matt Kumjian, a professor of atmospheric sciences at Pennsylvania State University who specializes in the study of giant hail. 

Kumjian was able to estimate the stone’s as between 6.27 and 6.57 inches across.

‘This means [Wednesday’s] hailstone counts as gargantuan and is one of only several well-documented cases of such large hail,’  Kumjian told the Washington Post.

As massive as it was, it doesn’t come close to threatening the US record eight-inch stone that was recorded during a hailstorm in Vivian, South Dakota, on July 23, 2010.

Lino Ramirez, of Hondo, Texas, posted a photo of the gargantuan hailstone beside a US quarter for scale

The hailstone was estimated to be between 6.27 and 6.57 inches in circumference

The hailstone was estimated to be between 6.27 and 6.57 inches in circumference

It was the largest ever recorded in Texas - but didn't beating the US record of 8 inches

It was the largest ever recorded in Texas – but didn’t beating the US record of 8 inches

Hail as big as softballs caused widespread destruction across Texas and Oklahoma, punching through roofs and shattering car windows, as rainfall flooded businesses and caused an estimated billion-plus dollars worth of damage.

Doppler radar – which detects particle type, intensity and motion – estimated the storm’s supercell was more than 64,000 feet tall, which is virtually unheard of for even the most powerful storms.

The Washington Post reported that radar picked up a drop in ‘differential reflectivity,’ – which compares the width of objects to their height. 

Raindrops are flatter, so values are usually positive. When values drop to near zero, it’s indicative of round or tumbling objects — and usually means big hail.

A National Weather Service damage survey found a 34-mile long and up to 9-mile wide swath of damaging winds in Medina County, including Hondo, from the supercell.

In Fort Worth car windows were shatter as the hailstorm swept through Texas

In Fort Worth car windows were shatter as the hailstorm swept through Texas

Hail as large as softballs punched through roofs in Sabinal Texas during the storm last week

Hail as large as softballs punched through roofs in Sabinal Texas during the storm last week

Hail punctured the walls of this home in D'Hanis, Texas

Hail punctured the walls of this home in D’Hanis, Texas

The storm's supercell was 64,000 feet tall at its peak - perfect conditions for large hail

The storm’s supercell was 64,000 feet tall at its peak – perfect conditions for large hail 

Hail during the storm was well into the gargantuan category, which describes hailstorms 6 inches across or larger

Hail during the storm was well into the gargantuan category, which describes hailstorms 6 inches across or larger

Winds estimated from 80 to 110 mph whipped the huge hailstones leading to severe damage in a trailer park, to vehicles and trees, and roofs. A brief EF1 tornado was spawned southeast of Hondo, according to the NWS survey.

This South Texas storm was one of three separate hailstorms over Texas and Oklahoma on April 28, which likely inflicted at least $1 billion damage combined.

Kumjian analyzed the hailstone using photogrammetry — a trigonometry-based approach of estimating the size of objects from photographs.

He told the Washington Post that he took into account the size of the quarter and the angle the photo was taken at to work out the stone’s size.

The largest ever recorded hailstone is believed to be found near Cordoba, Argentina, in February 2018, when a stone filmed during the storm was estimated as measuring 9.3 inches across, and was thought to exceed the world record.

According to the National Weather Service (NWS) in Norman, Oklahoma, the storm brought 70 miles per hour winds accompanied by baseball-sized hail with sizes that range from 1 to 3.5 inches in diameter. 

Northern Illinois University meteorologist Victor Gensini told USA Today the storm was a ‘a billion-dollar hail loss day across the US’.

‘San Antonio and Fort Worth, Texas – along with Norman – were all impacted with large to significant hail.’ 

Hailstones larger than six inches in diameter are considered to be gargantuan.  

19-year-old moves into a RETIREMENT community by mistake

A teenager has revealed that she accidentally moved into a retirement community, but it turns out that she enjoys living among senior citizens. 

Madison Kohout, 19, from Norman, Oklahoma, recounted her comical mistake on TikTok, explaining that she relocated to a small town in Arkansas last month and signed a lease without viewing the property.  

In the now-viral video, she is excitedly looking at the apartment listing on her laptop. The footage then cuts to her standing in front of a ‘Senior Citizen Apartments’ sign at the complex, hanging her head in embarrassment. 

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Whoops! Madison Kohout, 19, from Norman, Oklahoma, revealed on TikTok that she accidentally moved into a retirement community when she relocated the Arkansas 

Hilarious mistake: In her now-viral video, she can be seen standing in front of a 'Senior Citizen Apartments' sign at the complex, hanging her head in embarrassment

Hilarious mistake: In her now-viral video, she can be seen standing in front of a 'Senior Citizen Apartments' sign at the complex, hanging her head in embarrassment

Hilarious mistake: In her now-viral video, she can be seen standing in front of a ‘Senior Citizen Apartments’ sign at the complex, hanging her head in embarrassment

‘Me getting ready to move to an apartment out of state that I’ve never seen in person… and realize I just moved myself into a retirement home,’ she captioned the hilarious clip.  

Madison, who goes by Madi Ann, stunned TikTok users with her incredible story, which she has compared to something out of a Hallmark movie. 

The video has been viewed more than 3.4 million times and received thousands of comments from people who were everything from envious to confused.  

‘This could be a sitcom,’ one person wrote, while another added: ‘I may be boring as hell but this is my dream.’ 

‘Honestly this is the move,’ someone else agreed. ‘No loud neighbors. Plus they’ll probably make you tons of food.’ 

Others shared their own stories about living in retirement villages when they were young.   

Too funny: The teen, who goes by Madi Ann, signed the lease to her two-bedroom apartment before viewing the property, and she admitted it took her a week to realize her mistake

Too funny: The teen, who goes by Madi Ann, signed the lease to her two-bedroom apartment before viewing the property, and she admitted it took her a week to realize her mistake

Too funny: The teen, who goes by Madi Ann, signed the lease to her two-bedroom apartment before viewing the property, and she admitted it took her a week to realize her mistake

Living it up: Madi explained that the residence is considered equal opportunity housing, which means it does not discriminate by age

Living it up: Madi explained that the residence is considered equal opportunity housing, which means it does not discriminate by age

‘I had a friend who lived in one of these. Only a certain percent had to be seniors and it was such a nice place!!’ one TikToker shared. 

Someone else commented: ‘I lived in a retirement facility during my senior year in college and it was actually one of the best things to happen to me.’ 

While speaking with Newsweek, Madi admitted that it took her a bit of time to realize that she was by far the youngest person in the community.  

‘The first week of moving here was crazy! I was busy with finding a job and setting up my apartment, I didn’t even notice!’ she said.  

‘I thought it was a bit weird that all of my neighbors were significantly older than me. After my first week I saw a sign in front of the apartments, and it had clicked!’

Madi, who works as a nursing assistant, explained in a follow-up video that it was actually her mom, Gigi, who tipped her off about the spacious two-bedroom apartment that costs just $350 per month.  

The teen explained that the residence is considered equal opportunity housing, which means it does not discriminate by age.  

Blame mom! Madi, who works as a nursing assistant, explained that it was actually her mother, Gigi, who tipped her off about the apartment, which only costs $350 per month

Blame mom! Madi, who works as a nursing assistant, explained that it was actually her mother, Gigi, who tipped her off about the apartment, which only costs $350 per month 

Brilliant: Since Madi's initial video went viral, she has been detailing what her life is like in the retirement community in a series of playful TikToks

Brilliant: Since Madi's initial video went viral, she has been detailing what her life is like in the retirement community in a series of playful TikToks

Brilliant: Since Madi’s initial video went viral, she has been detailing what her life is like in the retirement community in a series of playful TikToks

She noted that she is ‘the only teenager in sight’ in the 10-unit complex, but she loves her neighbors, whom she considers to be ‘extra sets of grandparents.’  

‘I have also become friends with a lot of my neighbors. I have been able to go to dinner with them, have late-night conversations, and I have received some snacks as well! I love getting to know them and developing close relationships as well,” she told the publication. 

Since Madi’s initial video went viral, she has been detailing what her life is like in the retirement community in a series of playful TikToks. 

In one spoof, she pretends to be chatting it up with her neighbors ‘Brenda’ and ‘Betty’ while listing the benefits of living in a retirement community. 

‘How is life at the old folks’ home you might ask? Let me show you,’ she says. ‘When I get home it’s usually always super quiet. Because most of my neighbors are asleep by the time I get home. But one major perk is that I can play music whenever I want to because some of them can’t hear.

‘Another fun thing about living in the old folks’ home is I can always hear about the tea in town,’ she continues. ‘Another fun thing is whenever I get to come home after a long day, everyone asks me how I’m doing.’

‘Anyway that’s how my life is going here at the old folks’ home,’ she adds. ‘And just remember if you’re struggling with rent, start your early retirement.’ 

Giant hailstones ‘like bullets’ destroy cars, injure people and smash windows

Baseball-sized hailstones, tornadoes and flooding wreaked havoc across several southern states Wednesday night. 

In Texas, a powerful storm system produced hail as large as 3 inches to San Antonio and Fort Worth. Video shared on social media showed a fury of hail raining down in Haslet, Texas, as a storm passed through.

Tornado warnings were also issued in several parts of the state through Thursday morning. More than 16,000 people in Texas are still without power. 

Forecasters reported extreme cases of hailstones destroying cars and smashing the windows of businesses, including a Taco Bell, in Oklahoma. 

Several residents took to Twitter to share shocking images of the damage caused by the hailstones during the storm. 

One image shows massive holes in a window shade after hailstones smashed threw the glass in Norman, Oklahoma. 

One image shows massive holes in a window shade after hailstones smashed threw the glass in Norman, Oklahoma

Baseball-sized hailstones, tornadoes and flooding wreaked havoc across several southern states Wednesday night. One image shows massive holes in a window shade after hailstones smashed threw the glass in Norman, Oklahoma

Vehicles parked at local car dealerships in Norman were also damaged by the hail

Vehicles parked at local car dealerships in Norman were also damaged by the hail

The hailstones shattered windshields (pictured in Oklahoma) and dented exteriors

The hailstones shattered windshields (pictured in Oklahoma) and dented exteriors

The Taco Bell at 1024 24th St in Norman also suffered damage when the hailstones busted out the store’s windows. 

Vehicles parked at local car dealerships in Norman were also damaged by the hail. The hailstones shattered windshields and dented exteriors.  

At least one person reported an injury during the hailstorm in Norman and surrounding areas. 

According to the Storm Prediction Center, there were 38 reports of severe hail across Texas and Oklahoma.

Forecasters also said two tornadoes hit Pauls Valley and Stilwell, Oklahoma, Tuesday and into Wednesday. 

Experts estimated that the hail could cost Texas and Oklahoma up to $1billion once officials assess the full extent of the damage. 

The Taco Bell at 1024 24th St in Norman also suffered damage when the hailstones busted out the store's windows

The Taco Bell at 1024 24th St in Norman also suffered damage when the hailstones busted out the store’s windows

Broken windows are seen at the Taco Bell in Norman, Oklahoma, after the storm

Broken windows are seen at the Taco Bell in Norman, Oklahoma, after the storm 

One person shared that the hailstones caused a large hole in their roof (pictured in Texas)

One person shared that the hailstones caused a large hole in their roof (pictured in Texas) 

‘Yesterday was certainly a billion-dollar hail loss day across the US,’ meteorologist Victor Gensini told USA Today. 

‘San Antonio and Fort Worth, Texas – along with Norman – were all impacted with large to significant hail. In addition, there was one gargantuan (4 inch) hail report near Hondo, Texas.’ 

Meanwhile, a slow moving storm system swept across parts of Missouri and northwest Arkansas, causing severe flooding in both states. 

The National Weather Service (NWS) said parts of Arkansas should expect downpours into Friday. 

About six inches of rain is estimated to have already fallen in some areas while others parts of Arkansas reported three inches of rain. 

Forecasters said the state could see additional three inches of rain, which can cause flash flooding. 

The rain has so far caused severe flooding in parts of Arkansas and a tornado was spotted in Benton County Wednesday morning.

Forecasters reported extreme cases of hailstones in parts of Oklahoma (depicted)

Forecasters reported extreme cases of hailstones in parts of Oklahoma (depicted)

Meanwhile, a slow moving storm system swept across parts of Missouri and northwest Arkansas (pictured), causing severe flooding in both states

Meanwhile, a slow moving storm system swept across parts of Missouri and northwest Arkansas (pictured), causing severe flooding in both states

First responders are seen preparing to assist a driver after a bus was overcome with flood waters in Arkansas

First responders are seen preparing to assist a driver after a bus was overcome with flood waters in Arkansas 

Police assist an Arkansas resident whose vehicle became flooded during a storm on Wednesday

Police assist an Arkansas resident whose vehicle became flooded during a storm on Wednesday 

About six inches of rain is estimated to have already fallen in some areas while others parts of Arkansas (pictured on Wednesday) reported three inches of rain

About six inches of rain is estimated to have already fallen in some areas while others parts of Arkansas (pictured on Wednesday) reported three inches of rain

A police officer is seen helping a woman from her car during flooding in northwest Arkansas on Wednesday

A police officer is seen helping a woman from her car during flooding in northwest Arkansas on Wednesday 

Forecasters said Arkansas could see additional three inches of rain, which can cause flash flooding

Forecasters said Arkansas could see additional three inches of rain, which can cause flash flooding

In Missouri, storms caused wind damage and flooding at a popular state park.

Live camera footage showed raging waters at Roaring River, a popular fishing destination 8 miles south of Cassville in Barry County, the Springfield News-Leader reports.

‘This is a major, major flood today,’ said Paul Spurgeon, Roaring River Hatchery manager. ‘We got about 3 inches in 40 minutes.’

The main concern is the hatchery building, which rests on the lowest area and is full of fingerlings, or baby trout.

‘We’re trying to keep those guys going right now,’ Spurgeon said.

Other flooded spots included Reeds Spring and a highway just south of the Busiek State Forest and Wildlife Area in Christian County.

Meanwhile, reports of wind damage have come in from several places, including Branson, areas near Silver Dollar City, Highlandville and Sparta.

‘We did have tornado warnings extended farther eastward, so we may be getting additional reports of wind damage from there,’ said Megan Terry, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, adding that no tornadoes had been verified as of Wednesday afternoon.