Ferrari launches two new 812 Competizione models costing £500k

Ferrari has today launched two new matching 200mph supercars – including an unexpected convertible – and it will be a competition to see which one wins out with fans.

The Italian car-maker took the wraps of its new 812 Competizione – in both hard-top coupe and a surprise Targa version – with prices expected either side of half a million pounds each. It described the matching pair as ‘two interpretations of Ferrari’s racing soul’.

Ferrari had previously also kept the Competizione name a secret – causing the coupe version shown last month to be dubbed ‘the car with no name’. 

The Italian car-maker took the wraps of its new 812 Competizione – in both hard-top coupe and a surprise Targa version – with prices expected either side of half a million pounds each

The cars will be produced in limited numbers: 999 coupes and 599 convertibles, all of which were already sold-out via their ‘family’ of regular customers and collectors.

It said prices were ‘around’ £500,000 for the coupe, with deliveries from the first quarter of next year, and £578,000 for the convertible with deliveries from Autumn 2022, but that exact pricing would be decided according to market.

The firm dodged the question of whether this would be Ferrari’s last V12 engine before the move to an electric Ferrari. 

The convertible 812 Competizione A (the A stands for Aperta or ‘open’) is described as a ‘spectacular Targa-top version’ paying homage to the Prancing Horse’s ‘glorious open-top tradition.’ The Targa-top roof made of carbon fibre will open in around 14 seconds, it said. 

Powered by a mighty 830 horse-power 6.5 litre V12 engine linked to a seven-speed F1 automatic gearbox, the cars will accelerate from rest to 62mph in just 2.85 seconds, and 124mph in 7.5 seconds, up to a top speed in excess of 211mph. 

The convertible 812 Competizione A (the A stands for Aperta or 'open') is described as a 'spectacular Targa-top version' paying homage to the Prancing Horse's 'glorious open-top tradition.'

The convertible 812 Competizione A (the A stands for Aperta or ‘open’) is described as a ‘spectacular Targa-top version’ paying homage to the Prancing Horse’s ‘glorious open-top tradition.’

The Targa-top roof made of carbon fibre will open in around 14 seconds, says Ferrari. It will be produced in smaller numbers than the coupe - and be around £78,000 pricier

The Targa-top roof made of carbon fibre will open in around 14 seconds, says Ferrari. It will be produced in smaller numbers than the coupe – and be around £78,000 pricier

For those who take a special interest in matters Ferrari, it has lapped the firm’s fabled Fiorano test circuit in 1 minutes and 20 seconds – meaning it’s been bettered only by the latest SF90 Stradale and SF90 Spider and the multi-million-pound LaFerrari hypercar.

The lightweight limited-edition special series cars are derived from the earlier 812 Superfast models and were launched globally online from the firm’s recently-opened GT Sporting Activities Department located alongside the Fiorano track and began with the 812 Competizione completing several laps of the circuit.

Ferrari said: ‘This duo of cars is dedicated to a very exclusive group of collectors and enthusiasts of the most noble of Ferrari traditions, which focuses on uncompromising maximum performance. The innovative technological concepts applied to the engine, vehicle dynamics and aerodynamics have raised the bar to new heights. ‘

It promises owners who can stretch to the expected £500,000 price-tag ‘instantaneous responsiveness’ and ‘maximum fun behind the wheel and driving exhilaration.’

The 812 Competizione and 812 Competizione A are derived from the award-winning 6.5-litre naturally aspirated V12 engine powering the 812 Superfast – but enhanced and re-engineered to boost its output ‘to achieve a new record red line.’ Maximum revs are now 9,500 rpm.

‘This, together with a rising crescendo of torque delivery, unleashes a feeling of progressive and boundless power and acceleration,’ says Ferrari.

Ferrari had previously kept the Competizione name a secret ¿ causing the coupe version shown last month to be dubbed 'the car with no name'

Ferrari had previously kept the Competizione name a secret – causing the coupe version shown last month to be dubbed ‘the car with no name’

The cars will be produced in limited numbers: 999 coupes and 599 convertibles, all of which were already sold-out via their ¿family¿ of regular customers and collectors

The cars will be produced in limited numbers: 999 coupes and 599 convertibles, all of which were already sold-out via their ‘family’ of regular customers and collectors

The single exhaust tailpipes each side (singles rather than twin) – are visible to underscore their function to deliver a roaring sound and emphasise car’s track-inspired character.

Tweaks to the cars’ seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox has reduced shift times by a further five per cent and made them feel sportier.

Improvements to the aerodynamics and vents translates into 10 percent more efficient cooling of the engine fluids than in the 812 Superfast.

Ferrari noted: ‘The fact that the car is faster into corners demanded an improvement in braking power.

‘Taken together these solutions hail a significant improvement in performance: optimising the air vents contributes to a 30 percent increase in overall front downforce while the new side vortex generator adds a further 40 percent.’ 

Ferrari 812 Competizione coupe
Ferrari 812 Competizione Aperta

Inside, there’s not much different to separate the coupe (pictured left) from the open-top Aperta (pictured right)

Ferrari says that great attention was paid to the design of the cockpit with the extensive use of carbon-fibre trim, lightweight technical fabrics and a reduction in sound-proofing

Ferrari says that great attention was paid to the design of the cockpit with the extensive use of carbon-fibre trim, lightweight technical fabrics and a reduction in sound-proofing

To improve stability and down-force, the front diffuser is equipped with a passive mobile aero system which opens at speeds of over 155mph ( 250km/h).

Meanwhile, the rear diffuser extends right across the full width of the car, producing an increase in downforce that equates to 25 percent of the total increase: ‘This jumps to 35 percent if the contribution of the exhausts blowing into the wake is also taken into account. The rear underbody, on the other hand, is responsible for a 10 percent increase in rear downforce. ‘

On the open-topped version, styling is designed to ensure maximum comfort and minimum disturbance to occupants, even when the roof is open at high speed.

Will it fit in my garage? Ferrari 812 Competizione 

Length: 4,696 mm

Width: 1,971 mm

Height: 1,276 mm

Wheelbase: 2,720 mm

Dry weight: 1,487 kg

Engine: 6496 cc V12

Power: 830 horse-power 

Transmission: 7-speed F1 DCT

Top speed: more than 211mph (340 km/h)

0-62mph: 2.85 sec

0-124mph: 7.5 sec

Fiorano circuit lap time: 1:20

Weight distribution: 49% front – 51% rear

Fuel tank capacity: 92 litres

Fuel consumption: TBC

CO2 emissions: TBC

Front tyres: 275/35 ZR20; 10′ J x 20′

Rear tyres: 315/35 ZR20; 11.5′ J x 20′ 

Front brakes: 398 mm x 223 x 38 mm

Rear brakes: 360 mm x 233 x 32 mm

 

Various traction control and new ‘side slip controls’ help maintain balance.

Ferrari said: ‘Particular attention was also paid to making the car as light as possible, which resulted in 38 kg being slashed off its overall weight compared to the 812 Superfast. The areas primarily involved were the powertrain, running gear and body-shell. Carbon-fibre was used extensively on the exterior, especially on the front bumpers, rear bumpers, rear spoiler and air intakes. ‘

It added: ‘Great attention was also paid to the design of the cockpit with the extensive use of carbon-fibre trim, lightweight technical fabrics and a reduction in sound-proofing. There are also dedicated sporty, lightweight forged aluminium rims and titanium studs.’

All-carbon-fibre rims are also being made available for the very first time on a Ferrari V12 and offer a total weight reduction of 3.7 kg compared to the lightweight forged 812 Superfast wheels.

Focussing on the open-topped 812 Competizione A, Ferrari said: ‘It provided the Ferrari Styling Centre with the opportunity to use the modifications required for the rear of the car to create a truly unforgettable architecture.

‘The car’s centre of gravity appears lower, particularly when seen from the side, not only because of the roof and wraparound windscreen that flows into the side windows, but also because the flying buttresses at the rear are lower than in the 812 Competizione.’

It noted: ‘With the Targa top stowed, the roll bars partly jut out above the rest of the bodywork but because they are carbon-fibre, they become secondary visual elements and so do not compromise the broader, more squat stance created by the flying buttresses. This amplifies the visual lowering of the side view.’

With the roof closed, the roll bars connect perfectly with the roof structure forming a seamless unit.

It noted: ‘The targa top is made from carbon-fibre to create a sense of aesthetic continuity with the roll-bars.’

‘In the open-top configuration, it is stowed in a compartment with the same design shape as the targa itself. Being able to stow the top at any time means the car can be enjoyed to the full, whatever the weather.’ 

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

Can I make the DVLA an offer for a personalised number plate?

I registered interest in six personalised number plates nearly two years ago but they still haven’t been auctioned off: Can I make the DVLA an offer?

In summer 2019, I registered interest in half a dozen personalised number plates all at the same time on the DVLA website which says I will be alerted when any of these are auctioned off.

I presumed at least one of them would be available by now but they haven’t been. I was wondering if there is a rough timeframe for these things and whether the pandemic had pushed any of these auctions back?

I also wondered if there was anyway of approaching the DVLA and coming up with a fair price for any of them?

The DVLA holds nine auctions every year. Its next auction, which includes 2500 registrations, will be held online between 12 and 18 May.

Ed Magnus of This is Money replies: It’s a good question and worth pointing out that that there is no indication that any auctions have been pushed back due to the pandemic.

In fact, the past year has seen more personalised registrations sold by the DVLA than ever before.

In the eleven months between 1 April 2020 and 28 February 2021 there were 548,998 personalised registrations sold by the DVLA compared to 408,336 sold in the 12 months preceding it. 

The next auction will be held online between 12 and 18 May and will include 2,500 registration plates – so it is possible one might now be available.

Information about the registrations on offer, their starting prices and details on how to register and submit a bid can be found on the DVLA website.

We contacted the DVLA to try and secure some further clarity on the matter.

Total number of personalised registrations sold by DVLA in the last 10 years (at auction and via the website)
Year Numbers sold
2010-11 256,747
2011-12  216,166 
2012-13  222,237 
2013-14  246,465 
2014-15  281,994 
2015-16  334,818 
2016-17  374,968 
2017-18  381,856 
2018-19  403,986 
2019-20  408,336 
2020-21 (11 months)  548,998 

A spokesperson for the DVLA replies: The DVLA holds nine auctions every year and the eventual selling price of a registration will depend upon demand on the given day.

There are also more than 50million fixed price registrations available for sale on our website, with almost endless possibilities of combinations to suit a person’s taste, interests and budget, with prices starting at just £250.

It may be helpful to explain that we don’t accept offers on registrations sold through auction.

While the DVLA retains income to recover the costs in administering personalised registrations services, the remaining balance is paid to HM Treasury

While the DVLA retains income to recover the costs in administering personalised registrations services, the remaining balance is paid to HM Treasury

Each registration has a starting price where bidding will start and it will be sold to the highest bidder.

Where a customer requests a particular registration, we try and make this available for sale at auction at the soonest opportunity.

There is considerable demand for certain styles of registration, meaning that some of the more popular requests may take longer than others. 

What not to forget after your purchase? 

Ed Magnus of This is Money replies: Once you purchase a new registration number, don’t forget to inform your insurance company of the change.

Also, you’ll need to update your registration number for any automatic payment accounts you have set up for your current registration number.

For example, the Congestion Charge, the ultra-low emissions zone charge, and the Dartford tunnel charge among others.

Otherwise, you risk getting hit by a fine if you do not update your registration details when entering one of these zones.

Also, if you have one, don’t forget to update your on-street parking permit with the new registration number.

All these things may seem obvious, but can be equally forgettable and costly.

Advertisement

Full-scale radio control car you can drive will cost £7,200 and is ROAD LEGAL

A British company is set to offer big kids across the country the chance to live out their childhood dreams of driving a life-size remote control car on the road.

The Little Car Company will hand-build electric, driveable versions of the Tamiya Wild One radio control car – and buyers can get a road legal kit that qualifies the vehicle as a ‘quadricycle’ so it can be used legally on the road.

The bonkers vehicles will cost from £7,200 in the UK, be capable of speeds that are ‘sensible’ for road use and have up to 100 miles of range. Order books are set to open soon ahead of first deliveries next year.

‘Honey, I blew up the remote control car!’: UK-based The Little Car Company has today announced plans to build a scaled-up version of one of the most iconic remote control cars that buyers will be able to drive

The lifesize creation has been been officially licenced by Japanese remote control car manufacturer, Tamiya, which first produced the toy in 1985.

It is renowned as one of the iconic R/C models of all time and was relaunched to the market in 2012 to the excitement of plenty of nostalgic middle-aged people. 

The radio controlled car was in 1/10th scale to what a full size version was imagined to be. However, this latest iteration is about to take things to a whole new scale – literally.  

The Wild One Max will have a top speed of 30mph and a peak power output of 4kW, which is around 5.5bhp. Power comes from a single PowerPack onboard with a capacity of 2kWh and a range of up to 25 miles, depending on terrain and driving style. However, performance upgrades will be available

The Wild One Max will have a top speed of 30mph and a peak power output of 4kW, which is around 5.5bhp. Power comes from a single PowerPack onboard with a capacity of 2kWh and a range of up to 25 miles, depending on terrain and driving style. However, performance upgrades will be available 

Rather than being 1/10th of full size, the Wild One MAX will be an impressive 8/10th scale and be suitable for drivers between 160cm (5ft3) and 195cm (6ft5) tall. 

This means those who grew up in the late 1980s and early 1990s will be able to live out their Honey, I Shrunk the Kids! (and Honey, I Blew Up the Kid! sequel) childhood fantasy of being of adequate size to see one of their toys at a real-size scale. 

Although at 8/10th scale, it is still slightly smaller than how a full size version was originally envisaged. 

Production will be at the company’s Bicester Motion HQ in Oxfordshire and, like the toy version, it can be purchased from The Little Car Company and then assembled by the customer at home – though they will need a bigger box to store it in their garage. 

The rear-wheel drive, off-road electric buggy will be approximately 3.5 metres long, 1.8m wide and weigh around 250kg.

It uses a spaceframe chassis, four-wheel coil-over suspension and 15-inch off-road tyres on lightweight wheels. 

The buggy’s braking system includes hydraulic Brembo disc brakes on each corner, backed up by regenerative braking to maximise range, just like you’d find in full-scale electric and hybrid cars in showrooms today.

It also comes with a three-point seatbelt, digital gauges and a racing steering wheel. 

The Little Car Company will produce a supply of 8/10th scale Wild One Max buggies and will provide additional packs that will make it road legal for use

The Little Car Company will produce a supply of 8/10th scale Wild One Max buggies and will provide additional packs that will make it road legal for use

The Wild One was released by Tamiya in 1985 and again in 2012. It is recognised as one of the toys of a generation for those growing up in that era

The Wild One was released by Tamiya in 1985 and again in 2012. It is recognised as one of the toys of a generation for those growing up in that era 

Anyone who has played with a remote control car in the past – especially one of Tamiya’s high-performance examples – will know they have blistering acceleration and surprisingly rapid top speeds.

However, this won’t necessarily be the case here. The ‘base’ Wild One Max comes will have a top speed of 30mph and a peak power output of 4kW, which is around 5.5bhp. 

Power comes from a single PowerPack onboard with a capacity of 2kWh and a range of up to 25 miles, depending on terrain and driving style.

If you would like to go faster or further, up to four modular PowerPacks can be used at one time to increase the performance and range. These cost an extra £1,000 each, meaning paying out another £3,000 for the most potent set-up. 

In theory, this should boost the range to up to 100 miles. And while The Little Car Company tells us the outright top speed should be ‘sensible for the road’, it won’t disclose what that precise figure is until it has completed ‘full testing’.

‘We may look at a long range system in the future to add even more performance and range,’ it said. 

The life-size R/C car will be produced by The Little Car Company in Oxfordshire and, like the toy, have the option for customers to build their vehicle at home. It is likely to need a fairly large box

The life-size R/C car will be produced by The Little Car Company in Oxfordshire and, like the toy, have the option for customers to build their vehicle at home. It is likely to need a fairly large box

The life-scale model of this Tamiya radio controlled car will have the option of using up to four modular PowerPacks at one time to increase the performance and range. These cost an extra £1,000 each, meaning paying out another £3,000 for the most potent set-up

The life-scale model of this Tamiya radio controlled car will have the option of using up to four modular PowerPacks at one time to increase the performance and range. These cost an extra £1,000 each, meaning paying out another £3,000 for the most potent set-up

Rather than being 1/10th of full size, the Wild One Max will be an impressive 8/10th scale of what a full size car is envisaged to be and be suitable for drivers between 160cm (5ft3) and 195cm (6ft5) tall

Rather than being 1/10th of full size, the Wild One Max will be an impressive 8/10th scale of what a full size car is envisaged to be and be suitable for drivers between 160cm (5ft3) and 195cm (6ft5) tall

The life-size remote control car will be road legal as it qualifies as a ‘quadricycle’

The firm has confirmed is that it will be entirely road legal, if buyers want it to be.   

Among the selection of upgrade ‘Hop-Up’ packs will be a ‘Tarmac Pack’ that adds road tyres and mudguards and ‘Road Legal’ packs providing the components required to build the vehicle to be compliant with L6e or L7e Quadricycle legislation in Europe, or Neighbourhood Electric Vehicle legislation in the USA. 

The customisable electric cars will cost from £6,000 plus local taxes, so from £7,200 in the UK with VAT included

The customisable electric cars will cost from £6,000 plus local taxes, so from £7,200 in the UK with VAT included

These packs will include brake lights, indicators, reflectors and rear-view mirrors so you have everything to make your vehicle fully road legal. 

While the vehicle will qualify as a ‘quadricycle’, younger motorists won’t be able to legally get behind the wheel on the road. 

That’s because the current legislation demands that only ‘light quadricycles’ weighing less than 350kg and with a top speed no higher than 45kmh (27mph) are eligible for 16-year-old drivers to use. 

Ben Hedley, CEO of The Little Car Company – which already produces scaled-down versions of Bugatti’s Type 35 (called the Bugatti Baby II) and Aston Martin DB5 Junior, both of which cost in excess of £50,000 – said of the scaled-up remote control car: ‘As a child of the ’80s, developing an almost full-size Tamiya model, which you can actually drive, is a dream come true. 

‘We are honoured to be working with the Tamiya team on the project to bring one of their most iconic models to life for a new generation. 

‘Because it is still early days in the project, we have the opportunity to include the feedback and feature suggestions from the legions of Tamiya fans out there. 

‘We encourage anyone with imaginative ideas and feedback around the engineering of the project to sign up to the newsletter at WildOneMax.com. We can’t wait to get these on, and off, the road in 2022!’

Pete Binger, chief executive of The Hobby Company, which is Tamiya UK’s official distributor, added: ‘We are massively flattered and thrilled by the launch of the Wild One Max by The Little Car Company under official licence from Tamiya. 

‘Tamiya assembly R/C kits, especially our unique buggy range, have captured the imaginations of generations for over 40 years. 

‘The prospect of a nearly full-size Tamiya buggy, which can be built and driven, is truly exciting and will be the ultimate vehicle for any Tamiya fan.’ 

The Tamiya Wild One MAX is expected to cost from £6,000 plus local taxes – so £7,200 with VAT – and is planned for global release in 2022. 

Customers can reserve a build slot from today at WildOneMax.com with a £100 fully refundable deposit. Build slots are allocated on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. 

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

Full-scale radio control car you can drive will cost £6,000 and is ROAD LEGAL

A British company is set to offer big kids across the country the chance to live out their childhood dreams of driving a life-size remote control car on the road.

The Little Car Company will hand-build electric, driveable versions of the Tamiya Wild One radio control car – and buyers can get a road legal kit that qualifies the vehicle as a ‘quadricycle’ so it can be used legally on the road.

The bonkers vehicles will cost from £6,000 in the UK, be capable of speeds that are ‘sensible’ for road use and have up to 100 miles of range. Order books are set to open soon ahead of first deliveries next year.

‘Honey, I blew up the remote control car!’: UK-based The Little Car Company has today announced plans to build a scaled-up version of one of the most iconic remote control cars that buyers will be able to drive

The lifesize creation has been been officially licenced by Japanese remote control car manufacturer, Tamiya, which first produced the toy in 1985.

It is renowned as one of the iconic R/C models of all time and was relaunched to the market in 2012 to the excitement of plenty of nostalgic middle-aged people. 

The radio controlled car was in 1/10th scale to what a full size version was imagined to be. However, this latest iteration is about to take things to a whole new scale – literally.  

Rather than being 1/10th of full size, the Wild One MAX will be an impressive 8/10th scale and be suitable for drivers between 160cm (5ft3) and 195cm (6ft5) tall. 

This means those who grew up in the late 1980s and early 1990s will be able to live out their Honey, I Shrunk the Kids! (and Honey, I Blew Up the Kid! sequel) childhood fantasy of being of adequate size to see one of their toys at a real-size scale. 

Although at 8/10th scale, it is still slightly smaller than how a full size version was originally envisaged. 

Production will be at the company’s Bicester Motion HQ in Oxfordshire and, like the toy version, it can be purchased from The Little Car Company and then assembled by the customer at home – though they will need a bigger box to store it in their garage. 

The rear-wheel drive, off-road electric buggy will be approximately 3.5 metres long, 1.8m wide and weigh around 250kg.

It uses a spaceframe chassis, four-wheel coil-over suspension and 15-inch off-road tyres on lightweight wheels. 

The buggy’s braking system includes hydraulic Brembo disc brakes on each corner, backed up by regenerative braking to maximise range, just like you’d find in full-scale electric and hybrid cars in showrooms today.

It also comes with a three-point seatbelt, digital gauges and a racing steering wheel. 

The Wild One Max will have a top speed of 30mph and a peak power output of 4kW, which is around 5.5bhp. Power comes from a single PowerPack onboard with a capacity of 2kWh and a range of up to 25 miles, depending on terrain and driving style

The Wild One Max will have a top speed of 30mph and a peak power output of 4kW, which is around 5.5bhp. Power comes from a single PowerPack onboard with a capacity of 2kWh and a range of up to 25 miles, depending on terrain and driving style

The Little Car Company will produce a supply of 8/10th scale versions using electric power that will be road legal for use

The Little Car Company will produce a supply of 8/10th scale versions using electric power that will be road legal for use

The Wild One was released by Tamiya in 1985 and again in 2012. It is recognised as one of the toys of a generation for those growing up in that era

The Wild One was released by Tamiya in 1985 and again in 2012. It is recognised as one of the toys of a generation for those growing up in that era 

Anyone who has played with a remote control car in the past – especially one of Tamiya’s high-performance examples – will know they have blistering acceleration and surprisingly rapid top speeds.

However, this won’t necessarily be the case here. The ‘base’ Wild One Max comes will have a top speed of 30mph and a peak power output of 4kW, which is around 5.5bhp. 

Power comes from a single PowerPack onboard with a capacity of 2kWh and a range of up to 25 miles, depending on terrain and driving style.

If you would like to go faster or further, up to four modular PowerPacks can be used at one time to increase the performance and range. These cost an extra £1,000 each, meaning paying out another £3,000 for the most potent set-up. 

In theory, this should boost the range to up to 100 miles. And while The Little Car Company tells us the outright top speed should be ‘sensible for the road’, it won’t disclose what that precise figure is until it has completed ‘full testing’.

‘We may look at a long range system in the future to add even more performance and range,’ it said. 

The life-size toy will be produced by The Little Car Company in Oxfordshire and, like the toy, have the option for customers to build their vehicle at home. It is likely to need a fairly large box.

The life-size toy will be produced by The Little Car Company in Oxfordshire and, like the toy, have the option for customers to build their vehicle at home. It is likely to need a fairly large box.

The life-scale model of this Tamiya radio controlled car will have the option of using up to four modular PowerPacks at one time to increase the performance and range. These cost an extra £1,000 each, meaning paying out another £3,000 for the most potent set-up

The life-scale model of this Tamiya radio controlled car will have the option of using up to four modular PowerPacks at one time to increase the performance and range. These cost an extra £1,000 each, meaning paying out another £3,000 for the most potent set-up

Rather than being 1/10th of full size, the Wild One MAX will be an impressive 8/10th scale of what a full size car is envisaged to be and be suitable for drivers between 160cm (5ft3) and 195cm (6ft5) tall

Rather than being 1/10th of full size, the Wild One MAX will be an impressive 8/10th scale of what a full size car is envisaged to be and be suitable for drivers between 160cm (5ft3) and 195cm (6ft5) tall

The life-size remote control car will be road legal as it qualifies as a ‘quadricycle’

The firm has confirmed is that it will be entirely road legal, if buyers want it to be.   

Among the selection of upgrade ‘Hop-Up’ packs will be a ‘Tarmac Pack’ that adds road tyres and mudguards and ‘Road Legal’ packs providing the components required to build the vehicle to be compliant with L6e or L7e Quadricycle legislation in Europe, or Neighbourhood Electric Vehicle legislation in the USA. 

The customisable electric cars will cost from £6,000 plus local taxes, so from £7,200 in the UK with VAT included

The customisable electric cars will cost from £6,000 plus local taxes, so from £7,200 in the UK with VAT included

These packs will include brake lights, indicators, reflectors and rear-view mirrors so you have everything to make your vehicle fully road legal. 

While the vehicle will qualify as a ‘quadricycle’, younger motorists won’t be able to legally get behind the wheel on the road. 

That’s because the current legislation demands that only ‘light quadricycles’ weighing less than 350kg and with a top speed no higher than 45kmh (27mph) are eligible for 16-year-old drivers to use. 

Ben Hedley, CEO of The Little Car Company – which already produces scaled-down versions of Bugatti’s Type 35 (called the Bugatti Baby II) and Aston Martin DB5 Junior, both of which cost in excess of £50,000 – said of the scaled-up remote control car: ‘As a child of the ’80s, developing an almost full-size Tamiya model, which you can actually drive, is a dream come true. 

‘We are honoured to be working with the Tamiya team on the project to bring one of their most iconic models to life for a new generation. 

‘Because it is still early days in the project, we have the opportunity to include the feedback and feature suggestions from the legions of Tamiya fans out there. 

‘We encourage anyone with imaginative ideas and feedback around the engineering of the project to sign up to the newsletter at WildOneMax.com. We can’t wait to get these on, and off, the road in 2022!’

Pete Binger, chief executive of The Hobby Company, which is Tamiya UK’s official distributor, added: ‘We are massively flattered and thrilled by the launch of the Wild One Max by The Little Car Company under official licence from Tamiya. 

‘Tamiya assembly R/C kits, especially our unique buggy range, have captured the imaginations of generations for over 40 years. 

‘The prospect of a nearly full-size Tamiya buggy, which can be built and driven, is truly exciting and will be the ultimate vehicle for any Tamiya fan.’ 

The Tamiya Wild One MAX is expected to cost from £6,000 plus local taxes – so £7,200 with VAT – and is planned for global release in 2022. 

Customers can reserve a build slot from today at WildOneMax.com with a £100 fully refundable deposit. Build slots are allocated on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. 

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

We reveal the models with the lowest – and highest – first year car premiums

The Volkswagen Up! is the car has the lowest first year car insurance costs, costing drivers £1,483 on average, new research has revealed.

Motorists will have to shell out just £20 in road tax per year, for pre-2017 vehicles, and pay an average monthly lease of £67, according to data from Local Driving School.

It found the second cheapest model to insure is a Citroen C1, costing an average of £1,623 per year.

At the other end of the scale, a BMW 1 Series was found to be the most expensive to insure at £3,552 per year on average. 

The Volkswagen Up! is the car has the lowest first year car insurance costs, costing £1,483 on average, according to quote data collated by a comparison website

The average insurance costs are based on insurance quotes for first-time drivers within a year of passing their driving test. 

All results have been pulled from the lowest quotes given by a popular insurance comparison site. 

It found the Hyundai i10 and the Ford Ka were also two of the cheapest models to insure costing just £1,627 and £1,650 per year, respectively. 

However, while the Volkswagen Polo regularly ranks at the top of many hatchback roundups, the insurance costs are the second most expensive.

Drivers could be looking at paying £3,077 for the first year of driving in this popular car.

The third most expensive on the list is the Volkswagen Golf at £2,873 a year – £200 less than the VW Polo.  

CARS WITH THE HIGHEST FIRST YEAR INSURANCE COSTS 
1.    BMW 1 Series – £3,552 per year
2.    Volkswagen Polo – £3,077 per year
3.    Volkswagen Golf – £2,873 per year
4.    Ford Focus – £2,845 per year
5.    Mini Cooper – £2,844 per year
Source: Local Driving School 

Meanwhile, the UK’s most popular car, the Ford Fiesta, sits at an average of £2,354 to insure for a driver’s first year on the road.

However, if you opt for a pre-2017 EcoBoost model, £0 road tax and high fuel efficiency reduce this car’s costs.

Claire Davies, marketing manager at Local Driving School, said: ‘Car insurance is all about risk – with the popularity of the VW Polo, insurers also see lots of accidents and claims for this model, which result in higher insurance costs. 

‘Certain trim levels and specifications can also change the insurance group of a car dramatically.

‘To avoid any costly surprises, check insurance quotes on the exact model you’re looking at before buying, and compare this to similar models with different specifications. The smallest details can massively change the quoted price from these averages.

‘We also recommend checking the safety ratings of the cars you’re comparing – a high safety rating should be an important consideration in any purchase.’

Pricey: The BMW Series 1 was named the car with the highest insurance costs for the first year

Pricey: The BMW Series 1 was named the car with the highest insurance costs for the first year

CARS WITH LOWEST FIRST YEAR INSURANCE COSTS
1.    Volkswagen Up! – £1,483 per year
2.    Citroen C1 – £1,623 per year
3.    Hyundai i10 – £1,627 per year
4.    Ford Ka – £1,650 per year
5.    Toyota Aygo – £1,755 per year
Source: Local Driving School 

Average car insurance has fallen 

The average annual car insurance premium has dipped slightly to £602 in March 2021, separate research from Compare the Market shows.

This is a marginal decline of just £1.14 from the previous month suggesting the end of the big price falls.

However, the average premium is still £110 cheaper than the same month last year.

Some areas such as East Anglia, the West Midlands and Northern Ireland have already seen minor increases in premium costs month on month.

However, motorists will be glad that premiums are still at a six-year low, having plunged by more than £100 from March 2020.

Dan Hutson, head of motor insurance at Compare the Market, said: ‘The rapid fall in car insurance premiums, seen during the winter, appears to have come to a halt at the start of spring.

‘This could mean that premiums will start to rise through the next few months, with more cars on the road as businesses reopen and the economy gets back into gear, although big savings can still be made by shopping around.’

‘Drivers should remember to shop around when their policy comes to an end to ensure they get the best possible deal.

‘Now that lockdown is being lifted, households thinking about buying a new or used car might want to consider their insurance options. 

‘Insurers can change an existing policy but may charge an administration fee, or drivers can pay a cancellation fee and shop around for a new policy while premiums are still low – but bear in mind this can impact the no claims discounts for the year.’

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

Ferrari reveals its new 200mph supercar – but, for now, it has no name

The Ferrari with no name: Italian brand unveils a new 200mph special edition V12 supercar but won’t confirm what it’s called (or how much it costs)

  • Limited edition model is based on the 812 Superfast V12 but its official name won’t be confirmed until 5 May
  • Full details of its performance – and more importantly the price – will also be held back until next month 

Advertisement

Ferrari has released the first official photographs of its powerful new high-revving 200mph special edition 812 Superfast V12 – but for now it’s the car with no name.

Powered by a naturally-aspirated V12 engine it unleashes 830 horsepower and promises ‘a sensation of endless power and performance’, says Ferrari, adding: ‘It is the ultimate expression of Ferrari DNA: exclusivity, a racing soul and the pinnacle of automotive innovation.’

In performance terms it is set to eclipse the standard £263,000 800 horse-power 812 Superfast which is currently the fastest and most powerful Ferrari road-legal car, capable of accelerating from rest to 62mph in 2.9 seconds.

But despite promising reduced weight and ‘pure yet brutal power’, the Italian supercar firm said the new model’s name and further technical information will be revealed on May 5 during a live-streamed event on Ferrari’s social media channels.

The Ferrari with no name: This is the Italian marque’s latest special edition model that’s official name is being kept under wraps for another fortnight 

Ferrari said: ‘The new model is the ultimate expression of Ferrari’s concept of an extreme front-engined berlinetta, honing the characteristics of the critically-acclaimed 812 Superfast to a level never seen before’.

It added: ‘Aimed at Ferrari’s most passionate collectors and connoisseurs, it features numerous uncompromising engineering solutions to guarantee peerless driving pleasure.’

It says the car’s most striking feature lies at its very heart – in the V12 engine, which reaches the highest output of any Ferrari road-car engine – 830 horse-power– and revs to 9,500 rpm which is the highest of any , Ferrari internal combustion engine.

A new valve timing mechanism and a new exhaust system allow it to deliver performance levels ‘that are unprecedented in the V12 segment’.

Class-leading vehicle dynamics aim to guarantee ‘maximum fun behind the wheel’. This includes independent steering on all four wheels.

Ferrari says: ‘This extends the feeling of agility and precision when cornering as well as providing unparalleled responsiveness to steering inputs.’

Details about the new 200mph V12 supercar's performance - and price - will be revealed, along with the name, on 5 May, says the Italian brand

Details about the new 200mph V12 supercar’s performance – and price – will be revealed, along with the name, on 5 May, says the Italian brand

Powered by a naturally-aspirated V12 engine it unleashes 830 horsepower and promises ¿a sensation of endless power and performance¿, says Ferrari

Powered by a naturally-aspirated V12 engine it unleashes 830 horsepower and promises ‘a sensation of endless power and performance’, says Ferrari

It will also be lighter than the standard 812 Superfast thanks to extensive use of carbon fibre, both on the exterior and in the cockpit.

It also premieres the latest version of Ferrari’s ‘Side Slip Control’ vehicle dynamics system.

The car firm said in-depth aerodynamic research with the Ferrari styling centre has altered the car’s physical lines to give extreme profiles that are ‘unprecedented for a road-legal car.’

It explained: ‘The aerodynamic redesign of the whole car was aimed at maximising downforce levels: from the new front air intakes, rear diffuser and exhaust configuration to the patented design of the rear screen – which now hosts vortex generators. Every modification is a faithful expression of Ferrari’s core belief that form must always follow function.’

In performance terms it is set to eclipse the standard £263,000 800 horse-power 812 Superfast which is currently the fastest and most powerful Ferrari road-legal car, capable of accelerating from rest to 62mph in 2.9 seconds

In performance terms it is set to eclipse the standard £263,000 800 horse-power 812 Superfast which is currently the fastest and most powerful Ferrari road-legal car, capable of accelerating from rest to 62mph in 2.9 seconds

The car firm said in-depth aerodynamic research with the Ferrari styling centre has altered the car¿s physical lines to give extreme profiles that are ¿unprecedented for a road-legal car'

The car firm said in-depth aerodynamic research with the Ferrari styling centre has altered the car’s physical lines to give extreme profiles that are ‘unprecedented for a road-legal car’

Ferrari said: ‘This new special series has a strong personality all of its own that differentiates it significantly from the 812 Superfast on which it is based.

‘This was achieved by choosing styling themes that further enhance the architectural design and dynamism of the 812 Superfast, pushing its sporty vocation to new extremes.’

For example, the glass rear screen has been replaced with a single-piece aluminium structure.

Vortex generators which improve the car’s aerodynamic efficiency are fully integrated with the roof to create a ‘backbone effect’ that underscores the car’s sculptural form.

A carbon-fibre blade traverses the bonnet.

It will also be lighter than the standard 812 Superfast thanks to extensive use of carbon fibre, both on the exterior and in this beautifully crafted cockpit

It will also be lighter than the standard 812 Superfast thanks to extensive use of carbon fibre, both on the exterior and in this beautifully crafted cockpit

Ferrari said: It changes the overall perception of the car’s volumes. The bonnet seems shorter, emphasising the width of the car, and the tail now has a more powerful, fastback look.

‘This makes it appear more compact and competition-like despite it sharing the 812 Superfast’s silhouette, proportions and formal balance. ‘Even the rear spoiler now looks more imposing: it is higher but the specific design treatment used also makes the tail look very wide, almost horizontal.’

Although the interior still reflects the 812 Superfast – retaining the main dashboard and door panels – there are changes, says Ferrari: ‘Along with other elements of the interior, the door panel has been redesigned to reduce weight and, combined with the introduction of the H-gate theme on the tunnel, this lends the cockpit a sportier, more modern edge that reflects the car’s racing spirit.’

Advertisement

VW’s electric ID.4 SUV crowned World Car of the Year 2021

Volkswagen’s ID.4 electric family car been awarded the World Car of the Year gong in 2021, it has been announced.

The SUV, which is the second model in VW’s new ‘ID’ electric vehicle range, went on sale last year and in the UK costs from £41,570 for the most affordable ‘Life’ version.

It was voted the winning vehicle by a jury of 93 international journalists from 28 countries who agreed it is the standout car of this year, securing the German brand’s fifth crown at the World Car of the Year awards since it was established in 2004.

World Car of the Year: Volkswagen’s ID.4 electric SUV has taken the crown in 2021

Commenting on the victory, Ralf Brandstätter, Volkswagen Cars CEO, said: ‘We are particularly pleased about our ID.4 being named World Car of the Year. Not only because it is one of the most important car awards in the world – but because the jury also honoured a great idea and a great team. 

‘The first ID model for the key markets of Europe, China and the US carries our electric offensive around the world. 

‘A convincing car, a great idea – and the World Car of the Year award? That goes well together for us!’

The ID.4, which is currently available with a 77kWh battery mounted on the rear axle to drive the back wheels, has a range of between 314 and 323 miles on a full charge, can accelerate from zero to 60mph in 8.5 seconds and has an electronically limited top speed of 99mph.

It also has the capacity for 125kW DC rapid charging, meaning the battery can recover almost 200 miles of range in just 30 minutes if you can track down a charging device capable of providing the required level of juice.

The SUV, which is the second model in VW's new 'ID' electric vehicle range, went on sale last year and in the UK costs from £41,570 for the most affordable 'Life' version

The SUV, which is the second model in VW’s new ‘ID’ electric vehicle range, went on sale last year and in the UK costs from £41,570 for the most affordable ‘Life’ version

The ID.4 is currently available with a 77kWh battery mounted on the rear axle to drive the back wheels. It has a range of between 314 and 323 miles on a full charge

The ID.4 is currently available with a 77kWh battery mounted on the rear axle to drive the back wheels. It has a range of between 314 and 323 miles on a full charge

The ID.4 is capable of 125kW DC rapid charging, meaning the battery can recover almost 200 miles of range in just 30 minutes

The ID.4 is capable of 125kW DC rapid charging, meaning the battery can recover almost 200 miles of range in just 30 minutes

VW ID.4: Will it fit in my garage? 

On sale: Now 

Price: From £41,570

Battery: 77kWh (net) lithium-ion

Power: 201bhp

Torque: 310Nm

Transmission: Single-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive

0-62mph: 8.5 seconds

Top speed: 99mph

Range: Up to 323 miles

Charging: 125kW (10-80 per cent 35 mins) 

A smaller 52kWh battery pack offering a range of up to 224 miles – and a cheaper price – is due to hit the market later this year.

The ID.4 is one of the number of electric cars to suffer from the Government’s recent decision to slash to Plug-in Car Grant (PiCG).

The scheme, which previously offer to cover £3,000 of the list price of a new EV under the price of £50,000 has now been cut to a subsidy of just £2,500, and eligibility only for vehicles priced under £35,000.

It means the ID.4 no longer qualifies for the grant, with the cheapest model starting at £41,570.

It is yet to be confirmed if the new versions with a smaller-capacity battery will be priced to dip below the PiCG eligibility ceiling.

You can find out which electric cars do qualify for the scheme by reading our new PiCG car guide. 

The ID.4 follows in the tyre tracks of the Golf (2013 and 2019), Polo (2010) and Up! city car (2012) to take the award, and is the third electric car to receive the gong after the Nissan Leaf (2011) and Jaguar I-Pace (2019).  

The ID.4 can accelerate from zero to 60mph in 8.5 seconds and has an electronically limited top speed of 99mph

The ID.4 can accelerate from zero to 60mph in 8.5 seconds and has an electronically limited top speed of 99mph

The ID.4 is one of the number of electric cars to suffer from the Government's recent decision to slash to Plug-in Car Grant

The ID.4 is one of the number of electric cars to suffer from the Government’s recent decision to slash to Plug-in Car Grant

The ID.4 has taken the World Car of the Year crown for the fifth time since the awards were established in 2004

The ID.4 has taken the World Car of the Year crown for the fifth time since the awards were established in 2004

Other winners in the World Car of the Year 2021 parade

Land Rover’s Defender SUV missed out on the top prize but did scoop the World Car Design of the Year category win. 

Accepting the gong, JLR chief creative officer Gerry McGovern, said: ‘New Defender is influenced by its past but is not constrained by it and we are delighted it has been honoured with this award. 

‘Our vision was to create a 21st century Defender by pushing the boundaries of engineering, technology and design while retaining its renowned DNA and off-road capability. The result is a compelling 4×4 that resonates with customers on an emotional level.’

Honda’s electric Honda e was also named World Car Urban Car of the Year, the Porsche 911 Turbo hailed Performance Car of the Year and the Mercedes-Benz S-Class winning the award for the best luxury model.

The Land Rover Defender won World Car Design of the Year

Honda's compact 'e' electric vehicle won Urban Car of the Year

Left: The Land Rover Defender won World Car Design of the Year. Right: Honda’s compact ‘e’ electric vehicle won Urban Car of the Year

Porsche's 911 Turbo was hailed Performance Car of the Year

The all-new Mercedes-Benz S-Class won World Luxury Car of the Year for 2021

Left: Porsche’s 911 Turbo was hailed Performance Car of the Year. Right: The all-new Mercedes-Benz S-Class won World Luxury Car of the Year for 2021

SAVE MONEY ON MOTORING

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.