Derby fans accuse the club’s would-be owner Erik Alonso of passing off £42m TikTok house as his own

Derby County fans accuse the club’s would-be owner Erik Alonso of passing off a £42m TikTok house as his own after he posted a year-old video on Twitter… while he fails to provide proof of funds to complete his takeover

  • Prospective Derby owner Erik Alonso tweeted a video of a luxury mansion
  • Writing ‘Good Morning’, the Spaniard appeared to pass property off as his own
  • But the same clip, with identical backing track, was on TikTok in April last year
  • It was posted by Los Angeles-based luxury real estate agent Davis Pfaff 
  • Fans on social media were quick to see through Alonso’s ruse
  • Alonso’s takeover of the Pride Park club has stalled over proof he has the funds 

Prospective Derby County owner Erik Alonso has been rumbled by eagle-eyed fans after apparently trying to pass off a £42million mansion as his own.

The 29-year-old Spaniard, whose deal to buy the Championship club has stalled after he was unable to provide the EFL with proof of funds, posted a Twitter video showing off a lavishly decorated home with panoramic views.

Alonso captioned the tweet ‘Good Morning’ as though suggesting he was filming from inside the property.

Prospective Derby County owner Erik Alonso has been rumbled by eagle-eyed fans after apparently trying to pass off a £42million mansion as his own on social media

But Derby fans quickly saw through the ruse, spotting that the exact same video clip, with identical music, had been posted by Los Angeles-based luxury real estate agent Davis Pfaff back on April 11 last year.

Posting the TikTok clip to the backing track of Lose Control by Meduza, Becky Hill and Goodboys, Pfaff wrote: $60,000,000 Living Room vibes!’

One fan quote tweeted Alonso’s post and asked: ‘Is that really your house Erik, or have you just saved that video from TikTok?’

Another posted: ‘Derby’s potential new owner, Erik Alonso, has been asked by the EFL to prove that he has the funds to run a football club.

‘This morning he tweeted a video of a very fancy house. Only issue is it looks VERY similar to a very fancy house on TikTok.’

Stan Collymore wrote on Twitter in response: ‘Erik Alonso. He can use my house next time if he likes. Tik Tok literally for Derby County.’ 

Alonso's tweet on Tuesday was an 11-second clip filmed inside a luxury property

Alonso’s tweet on Tuesday was an 11-second clip filmed inside a luxury property

But the video - and the music accompanying it - was identical to a TikTok clip posted by LA-based real estate agent David Pfaff in April 2020

But the video – and the music accompanying it – was identical to a TikTok clip posted by LA-based real estate agent David Pfaff in April 2020

The original caption of the TikTok video by Pfaff said the property was worth $60million

The original caption of the TikTok video by Pfaff said the property was worth $60million 

Stan Collymore gave his reaction on Twitter to Alonso's use of the house video

Stan Collymore gave his reaction on Twitter to Alonso’s use of the house video 

It comes as Alonso, a football agent and boxing promotor, struggles to prove he has the funds to take over Derby, who narrowly avoided relegation to League One on Saturday.

The EFL’s owners and director test checks on Alonso’s suitability have ground to a half after he failed to provide the money required.

As Sportsmail revealed over the weekend, Alonso was asked by the EFL to deposit £35million in a British bank account a fortnight ago to prove he has funds to finance a takeover – but no cash has been forthcoming and Alonso has broken off contact.

The 29-year-old insists the buy-out remains on course, privately telling current Derby owner Mel Morris that he remains optimistic the deal can be concluded.

Alonso has claimed he could invest up to £150m into Derby, who are managed by former England captain Wayne Rooney.

Alonso has formerly been linked to takeovers at Sheffield Wednesday and Cardiff City

Alonso has formerly been linked to takeovers at Sheffield Wednesday and Cardiff City

Derby owner Mel Morris (above) will continue to fund the club until he finds a buyer

Derby owner Mel Morris (above) will continue to fund the club until he finds a buyer

Manager Wayne Rooney can't hide his delight as Derby dramatically secured their Championship status with a 3-3 draw against Sheffield Wednesday last Saturday

Manager Wayne Rooney can’t hide his delight as Derby dramatically secured their Championship status with a 3-3 draw against Sheffield Wednesday last Saturday

Sportsmail reported last week that Alonso attempted to secure a £20million loan with US lenders, guaranteed against the club’s stadium Pride Park and other club assets. He denies this.

It has been reported he might be backed by Indonesian businessman Raja Sapta Oktohari, although no evidence has been produced and Alonso himself has said: ‘It’s just me.’

Oktohari has also denied he is involved in Alonso’s Derby bid, saying last month: ‘The news is not true. I do know Erik Alonso. I knew him from boxing, not football. I don’t know what his motive is.’

Alonso has been linked to takeovers at Sheffield Wednesday and Cardiff City in the past, neither of which materialised.

Derby could still be relegated this season for a breach of Financial Fair Play rules with the EFL racing against time to apply the points deduction punishment which would see them drop into the third tier. 

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Derby could still be RELEGATED from Championship after EFL win appeal against FFP rule breach

2000 Chesterfield deducted nine points for financial irregularities — including not paying transfer fees and under-reporting gate receipts.

2002 Boston United deducted four points for misleading FA over player wages.

2004 Cambridge become the first of 16 clubs to be deducted 10 points for entering administration: Wrexham (2004), Boston (2006), Rotherham (2006 and 2007), Leeds (2006), Luton, Bournemouth (both 2007), Darlington, Stockport (both 2008), Southampton, Crystal Palace (both 2009), Plymouth (2010), Port Vale, Portsmouth (both 2011), Aldershot and Coventry (both 2012).

2007 Leeds are the first club to be docked points (15) for leaving administration without a Company Voluntary Agreement.

2008 Three League Two clubs are fined for breaching the same EFL requirement. Bournemouth and Rotherham are each fined 17 points and Luton lose 20 points. They are later docked a further 10 points.

2009 Portsmouth are the first Premier League side to lose points (nine) for entering administration. They’re given a 10-point deduction in the 2011-12 season and in 2012-13 are docked another 10 for leaving administration without a CVA. They are relegated to League Two that season.

2019 Birmingham are the first club to fall foul of the EFL’s profit and sustainability rules for breaching the maximum rolling three-year loss of £39million.

2019 Bury are deducted 12 points for arranging a CVA to ensure payment of the club’s creditors. Membership of the Football League is later withdrawn.

2019 Bolton are docked 12 points for entering administration — the new penalty. Wigan get the same in 2020.

2019 Macclesfield are deducted 17 points for various breaches including postponements following player strikes over non-payment of wages.

2020 Sheffield Wednesday are docked 12 points for breaching FFP rules by overspending, despite selling Hillsborough to owner Dejphon Chansiri for £60m. It’s reduced to six points on appeal but Owls are relegated to League One.

EFL cast further doubt on Erik Alonso’s potential takeover of Derby County

EFL cast further doubt on Erik Alonso’s potential takeover of Derby County after Spanish businessman fails to respond to demand to deposit £35m in a British bank account

  • EFL asked Spanish businessman Alonso to prove he has funds for a takeover
  • Alonso was asked to deposit £35m in a British bank account a fortnight ago
  • Derby celebrated Championship survival on Saturday after dramatic final day

The EFL asked Derby County’s aspirant owner Erik Alonso to deposit £35million in a British bank account a fortnight ago — to prove he has funds for a takeover — but no cash has been forthcoming and the EFL have heard nothing from Alonso since, Sportsmail can reveal.

Alonso, 29, a Spanish businessman, has claimed his buyout remains on course.

While the takeover rumbles on, Derby were on Saturday celebrating Championship survival.

Spanish businessman Erik Alonso has claimed his buyout of Derby remains on course 

Wayne Rooney can't hide his delight as Derby dramatically secured their Championship status

Wayne Rooney can’t hide his delight as Derby dramatically secured their Championship status 

Alonso has privately been telling Derby’s current owner Mel Morris that he remains optimistic, but one source close to Pride Park said: ‘Alonso seemed a no-hoper from the start and there’s been no evidence he’s got the funds to do the deal.’

Alonso’s investment vehicle to attempt a buyout, No Limit Sports (NLS), was registered at Companies House in October.

The only other NLS director is Tajinderpal Sumal, registered at Companies House as director at six other companies, all of them small entities or struck off.

Alonso has formerly been linked to takeovers at Sheffield Wednesday and Cardiff in the past

Alonso has formerly been linked to takeovers at Sheffield Wednesday and Cardiff in the past

Alonso — an agent to a few low- profile footballers also describes himself as a boxing promoter — has claimed he could invest up to £150m in Derby, and it has been reported he might be backed by businessman Raja Sapta Oktohari, although no evidence has been produced and Alonso himself has said: ‘It’s just me.’

Alonso has formerly been linked to takeovers at Sheffield Wednesday and Cardiff, neither of which happened.

Morris has insisted he will continue to fund the club until he finds a buyer, and is actively exploring other options, none close to fruition. 

Derby owner Mel Morris (above) will continue to fund the club until he finds a buyer

Derby owner Mel Morris (above) will continue to fund the club until he finds a buyer

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The inside story of Norwich’s return to the big time and why it’s details not dollars that matter

In the search for the antidote to the untrammelled greed of the six billionaire owners who were ready to lay waste to English football a fortnight ago, it might be hard to improve on a symbol of the intelligent, diligent stewardship of one of our leading clubs that sits at one end of their first team training pitch. And no, it’s not the Dulux dog.

Behind one of the goals at Norwich City’s impressive new training centre, protected from errant shots by strategically placed netting, David, the club’s gardener, kneels in the earth tending to rows of broad beans, kale, leek and chard. ‘Posh spinach, basically,’ he says.

The food grown here and the butternut squash in the greenhouse will be used for soups and vegetarian meals by the cooks in the players’ canteen. It is a step towards sustainability. If Ed Woodward ran Norwich, he’d sign a new official concrete partner so he could fill in that vegetable patch and pave it over; everyone knows there’s no profit in chard. But they do things differently here.

Norwich are back in the big time and will be looking to prove their doubters wrong in the Premier League

Norwich and their new training centre is a symbol of the intelligent, diligent stewardship of one of our leading clubs

Norwich and their new training centre is a symbol of the intelligent, diligent stewardship of one of our leading clubs

Keeper Tim Krul is one of the cornerstones of Norwich's Championship promotion campaign

Keeper Tim Krul is one of the cornerstones of Norwich’s Championship promotion campaign

At the behest of their highly rated sporting director, Stuart Webber, Norwich recently became the first English club to invest in the revolutionary football simulator, the £750,000 Soccerbot 360, and it will be installed on the other side of the main building at the training centre ready for the start of next season.

Webber, 37, researched the technology when he visited the then RB Leipzig director of football, Ralf Rangnick, in Germany. Rangnick is a proponent of the Soccerbot 360, which features a circular pitch surrounded by video walls on to which a series of projectors beam simulations of match scenarios. A player stands in the centre and makes passes towards the video wall with a football, which bounces back at them, developing reaction speed and decision-making.

There are plans, too, for two high-tech new swimming pools on the site to aid player recovery and fitness. There is a feeling here of a club who are more interested in details than dollars, even though they have to work hard to make their money go further. 

Since Webber arrived, there is also a feeling of a club always moving forward, always looking to innovate, always looking to provide the best environment for their players.

At the behest of sporting director, Stuart Webber, Norwich recently became the first English club to invest in the revolutionary football simulator

At the behest of sporting director, Stuart Webber, Norwich recently became the first English club to invest in the revolutionary football simulator

Norwich were accused by some of a lack of ambition the last time they were promoted to the Premier League because they refused to spend money they did not have. 

They still had debts and they stuck to their principles and decided they did not want to risk the future of the club to pay, say, £8million to take Tammy Abraham on loan. Clubs like Sheffield Wednesday, Derby and Sunderland went down a different road.

The criticism aimed at Norwich seems especially misguided now that we can see, in the shape of the desperation of clubs like Real Madrid and Barcelona to reap extra cash from the creation of the European Super League, exactly where profligacy and excess can lead. Norwich have eliminated their debt and are bouncing back from the Championship healthier and more confident than ever.

Goalkeeper Tim Krul, one of the cornerstones of Norwich’s Championship promotion campaign this season and the kind of player who exemplifies the idea that signings at a club need to be about character as well as talent, smiles at the mention of the vegetable patch. ‘I went over to look at it this morning actually,’ he says. ‘Little things like that sum up the values of the club. You don’t see that very often.

Webber researched the technology when he visited former RB Leipzig director Ralf Rangnick

Webber researched the technology when he visited former RB Leipzig director Ralf Rangnick

‘I arrived here three years ago and it was very different then. The training ground was just a lot of Portakabins. You should have seen the gym. It is on two floors now and it is state of the art but when I first signed, it was in a little conservatory. I will never forget it: I was doing my leg weights and there was rain coming through the roof and there were buckets on the floor positioned to catch all the leaks.

‘Now, we have one of the best training grounds in the country. It’s been amazing to be part of that journey. I have signed a couple of contract extensions here already. The club is doing a real life Football Manager.’

The club has a fine manager, too, in Daniel Farke and they sealed promotion back to the Premier League a fortnight ago after a season in the Championship and clinched the title yesterday with a victory over Reading. Norwich went straight back down the last time they made it to the top flight. The club are confident that will not happen again.

Partly, that is because players who were young and inexperienced at the start of last season and went into matches at cathedrals like Old Trafford and Anfield wide-eyed and awestruck, have come of age. They have been hardened by relegation and buoyed by the achievement of battling their way out of the Championship at the first opportunity.

Rub of the greens: The vegetable patch at Norwich's impressive training centre

Rub of the greens: The vegetable patch at Norwich’s impressive training centre

Krul, 33, is one of the leaders of the team now and the confidence on the ball he has exhibited at Norwich is one of the reasons why he is in pole position to be Holland’s starting keeper at the Euros this summer. ‘The big message of the club last summer was go away on holiday and come back hungry to prove people wrong and go again,’ he says. ‘They promised there would be a squad good enough to go straight back up and they kept their promise.

‘The first four games, there were people being linked with big teams and they had to get their head back in the Championship but the values stayed the same throughout. The first four games, we had four points and we were 20th. Then we won a couple and went on an amazing run. It’s a great league but you want to get out of it quickly.

‘We’re in a better position to succeed in the Premier League now. We did not have much experience last season but now we won’t be going to Old Trafford any more thinking ‘Oh goodness’. When I was at Newcastle, I remember being on the bench as a 17-year-old at Anfield and I saw Steven Gerrard warming up and the way he was striking the ball and I thought ‘Whoa, I’m not quite ready for this yet’.

The club has a fine manager in Daniel Farke, and his side have sealed their top-flight return

The club has a fine manager in Daniel Farke, and his side have sealed their top-flight return

‘And the boys here were chucked in the deep end last season. The first game of last season at Anfield, I looked around me and I could see some of the lads looking across at Van Dijk, Mane and Salah and then you hear You’ll Never Walk Alone and I could see…yeah. We were 4-0 down after 42 minutes. We went on a better run after that but we didn’t quite have the belief last season.’

Partly, it is because Norwich are a club run how you wish your club were run. They are controlled by Delia Smith and her husband, Michael Wynn-Jones, beneficent owners who clearly care about the club and the fans rather than seeing it — like Stan Kroenke, John W Henry, Joel Glazer et al — as a vehicle for them to make a few dollars more.

And partly, it is because much of what Norwich do on and off the pitch is guided by Webber, who has built a reputation as one of the most talented and shrewd operators in his position in the English game. His fingerprints are all over every aspect of the Norwich revival, from overseeing the construction of the training ground to clever player recruitment, to player motivation, to the refurbishment of the canteen and, yes, the vegetable garden.

Krul says Norwich were chucked in the deep end last season, with their first game at Anfield

Krul says Norwich were chucked in the deep end last season, with their first game at Anfield

Debt-free, Norwich are the model for upwardly mobile aspirational football clubs the EFL and the Premier League should be championing. It is also the kind of club the Dirty Dozen of the ill-conceived European Super League would have destroyed without a backwards glance.

There is no point disguising that. It is one of the reasons there is still so much anger about what the six billionaire owners of English clubs involved in the breakaway tried to do. The day after the ESL plans were announced, Norwich were told the next tranche of their payments were being suspended. They were reinstated as soon as the ESL collapsed.

It does not take a genius to work out that the advent of the ESL would have ripped the heart out of the Premier League’s television deal. At Norwich, they knew what it would have meant: as the Big Six English teams increasingly prioritised the ESL, Norwich suspected they would have found themselves facing a club’s Under-23s many weeks.

The credibility of the Premier League would have been destroyed. It would have become the new FA Cup, a competition where the big clubs play their B-teams against so-called lesser sides. Clubs like Norwich and Brighton, models of well-run clubs at the heart of their communities, would have suffered most grievously of all.

Norwich is a club controlled by Delia Smith (front) and ¿husband, Michael Wynn-Jones (back)

Norwich is a club controlled by Delia Smith (front) and ‎husband, Michael Wynn-Jones (back)

But now the ESL plans have collapsed, Norwich can look forward to the future with optimism again. They have a clutch of bright stars like Emi Buendia, Teemu Pukki, Todd Cantwell and Max Aarons, who have attracted attention from bigger clubs and, even though they are eager to hang on to as many of them as possible, they are ready to embrace pragmatism, too.

If they can get a big fee for Buendia, say, who is near the top of the Championship charts in goals and assists and who has attracted rave reviews all season, then maybe they will cash in so that they can strengthen the team elsewhere. Aarons was linked with Barcelona at the start of the season. He, too, is likely to be the target of interest from other clubs.

‘Next season, why can’t we do what Leeds have done this season?’ says Krul. ‘I mean, look at Villa, too. Two years ago, we were in the Championship with them. It is normal to have people saying we weren’t good enough last season and they are right. Of course we have to tweak things. We are not stupid.

‘I might have to decide to go a bit more direct sometimes when I have the ball at my feet rather than playing it out from the back. But we’ve played some amazing football by sticking to what we know. The last game against QPR, there were a few moves there, even with Holland, I’ve not seen something like that. It’s exciting. We have got some great talent here and hopefully we can keep our stars and have a proper crack at it next season.’

They have a clutch of bright stars like Emi Buendia (left) and right-back Max Aarons (right)

They have a clutch of bright stars like Emi Buendia (left) and right-back Max Aarons (right)

Krul sees no reason why Norwich cannot replicate what Aston Villa and Leeds have done in the Premier League

Krul sees no reason why Norwich cannot replicate what Aston Villa and Leeds have done in the Premier League