Jens Lehmann is SACKED from Hertha Berlin’s board after calling Dennis Aogo ‘a token black guy’

Jens Lehmann is SACKED from Hertha Berlin’s board after Arsenal Invincible and Germany legend accidentally sent Sky Sport pundit Dennis Aogo a WhatsApp message asking if he is the company’s ‘token black guy’

  • Jens Lehmann has become embroiled in a racism storm in Germany this morning
  • Arsenal Invincibles goalkeeper sent Sky Sport pundit Dennis Aogo a message asking if he was the company’s ‘token black guy’ on Tuesday evening
  • Aogo posted screenshot and said the message ‘probably wasn’t meant for him’
  • Lehmann has since been sacked from Hertha Berlin’s board as fans urge companies to cut ties with footballer-turned-pundit in wake of racism storm 

Jens Lehmann is embroiled in a racism storm in Germany after appearing to accidentally text Sky Sport pundit Dennis Aogo asking if he was the company’s ‘token black guy’.

Germany and Arsenal legend Lehmann, who himself is now a television pundit, has been sacked from his role on Hertha Berlin’s board after Aogo posted a screenshot of the text to Instagram.

In what appears to be a message mistakenly sent to Aogo, Lehmann – translated literally – says: ‘Is Dennis actually your “black” one?’, following it with a laughing emoji.

Dennis Aogo posted a screenshot of a message Jens Lehmann sent to him on WhatsApp

Footballer-turned-TV pundit Lehmann has since been sacked from Hertha Berlin's board

Footballer-turned-TV pundit Lehmann has since been sacked from Hertha Berlin’s board

Lehmann has since taken to Twitter to apologise for the message he sent to Aogo on WhatsApp

Lehmann has since taken to Twitter to apologise for the message he sent to Aogo on WhatsApp

Aogo posted a screenshot to his Instagram story shortly after, alongside the caption: ‘WOW… The message was probably not meant for me!!!’

Lehmann sent his WhatsApp shortly after coming off-air himself, having provided punditry for Manchester City’s Champions League win over PSG for German television.

He is now set to face plenty of backlash as fans urge various companies to cut ties with the 51-year-old, and Hertha Berlin have become the first to distance themselves from the ex-goalkeeper.

Aogo, pictured playing for Stuttgart in 2019, has 12 caps for the Germany national team

Aogo, pictured playing for Stuttgart in 2019, has 12 caps for the Germany national team

Aogo, pictured playing for Hannover, now works as a Sky Sport pundit in Germany

Aogo, with his wife Ina in December at a gala in Berlin, Germany

Aogo (pictured left for Hannover and right with his wife Ina in December) now works as a television pundit for Sky Sport in Germany

‘The consultant contract with Mr. Lehmann will be terminated. This eliminates the posting to Hertha’s supervisory board, ‘ said spokesman Andreas Fritzenkötter from Tennor Holding to Sky, while a statement added: ‘Hertha BSC distances itself from racism.’

Lehmann has since come out to issue both a public and private apology to Aogo, posting to his Twitter account: ‘In a private message from my cell phone to Dennis Aogo, an impression was created for which I apologized in conversation with Dennis. 

‘As a former national player he is very knowledgeable and has a great presence and brings odds at Sky.’

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Julian Nagelsmann closes in on Bayern Munich job as Bundesliga champions ‘agree deal with Leipzig’

BREAKING NEWS: Bayern Munich announce Julian Nagelsmann as their new manager after sealing world-record £21.7m compensation deal with RB Leipzig… and after Champions League winner Hansi Flick agreed to terminate contract to quit for Germany

Julian Nagelsmann has been announced as Bayern Munich’s new manager after the Bundesliga giants agreed a world-record £21.7million compensation package with RB Leipzig.

Nagelsmann agreed personal terms with the German champions on Monday, before a huge pay-off was sealed and the deal was announced on Tuesday morning.

The news will come as a huge blow to Tottenham in their search for a new manager, with the German high on their list of potential candidates.

Julian Nagelsmann will take over as Bayern Munich’s head coach on July 1 after leaving Leipzig

Nagelsmann will replace Hansi Flick as boss of the Bundesliga giants ahead of next season

Nagelsmann will replace Hansi Flick as boss of the Bundesliga giants ahead of next season 

RB Leipzig announced the deal on Tuesday morning after securing a huge £21.7m pay-off

RB Leipzig announced the deal on Tuesday morning after securing a huge £21.7m pay-off

Nagelsmann has impressed at the helm of RB Leipzig, guiding them to a third-placed finish last season, while this time around they sit second with five games to play.

The 33-year-old’s stock is very high and he is seen as one of the most promising young managers in world football. 

Nagelsmann has a 58 per cent win percentage with Leipzig during his two years at the club, having won 53 out of his 90 matches in charge, while he also impressed at Hoffenheim in his debut managerial job before that.

Current Bayern boss Flick announced earlier this month that he wants his contract terminated at the end of the season, with last season’s Treble-winning manager strongly linked to the Germany national team role.

Flick told reporters on April 17: ‘I told the team today that I informed the club during the week, after the game in Paris, I would like to terminate my contract at the end of the season.’

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First bones with living cells acted like BATTERIES for fish 423 million years ago, study reveals 

While our bones act as a support structure for our body, millions of years ago they behaved like batteries to help ancient fish travel long distances.

A team of German paleontologists analyzed bone structures of a 423 million-year-old jawless, armored extinct species that showed the creature’s bone cells dissolved some of the tissue to supply the bloodstream with calcium, phosphorous and other minerals.

Researchers found the cells transformed the bones into a kind of battery that stored nutrients that could be released at later times to provide fish with necessary fuel.

Yara Haridy, who is doing her PhD at the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, said: ‘This ability provided an undoubtable advantage to jawless fish with bone cells over vertebrates without.

‘This advantage was possibly so profound as to alter vertebrate evolution, as later jawed vertebrates retained bone cells.’

Researchers found the cells transformed the bones into a kind of battery that stored nutrients that could be released at later times to provide fish with necessary fuel. Pictured is a 3D image of where the ancient bone cells once lived in the fish

The study was conducted by a team from Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien (HZB), who analyzed a jawless fish from the extinct species called Osteostraci that lived in the late Silurian period about 423 million years ago.

The researcher set out to understand how modern-day bone cells came into existence.

The bone cells are interconnected by tiny channels so that they can exchange substances and electrochemical signals, allowing the bone to grow and regenerate.

Still, this complex architecture of live and inorganic material must have emerged at some point in the course of evolution and now the team has ‘discovered a possible milestone in this development.’ 

The study was conducted by a team from Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien (HZB), who analyzed a jawless fish from the extinct species called Osteostraci that lived in the late Silurian period about 423 million years ago

The study was conducted by a team from Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien (HZB), who analyzed a jawless fish from the extinct species called Osteostraci that lived in the late Silurian period about 423 million years ago

To reach these results, the team examined samples under the focused ion beam of a scanning electron microscope to calculate 3D images from the data

The technology is traditionally used to study battery corrosion, but allowed researchers to view that fossils at high resolution and in 3D.

The scans did not show the actual bone cells, as they had disappeared ling ago, but they showed cavities where bone cells once lived inside the ancient fish, National Geographic reports.

HZB physicist Markus Osenberg said: ‘Due to the countless paths through the bone, the sample surface is as full of holes as Swiss cheese.’

‘In fact, the structures in the bone samples are relatively similar to the structures in the electrode materials of batteries. But the fact that the neural network, which learned on battery materials, can now also image the fossil bone samples so well surprised us.’

To reach these results, the team examined samples under the focused ion beam of a scanning electron microscope to calculate 3D images from the data The technology is traditionally used to study battery corrosion, but allowed researchers to view that fossils at high resolution and in 3D

To reach these results, the team examined samples under the focused ion beam of a scanning electron microscope to calculate 3D images from the data The technology is traditionally used to study battery corrosion, but allowed researchers to view that fossils at high resolution and in 3D

The 3D images display a complex network with cavities (lacunae) for the bone cells and tiny channels through the bone interconnecting these cavities. " Pictured is images of bone samples, with the circular-shape representing the bone cells that dissolved tissue

The 3D images display a complex network with cavities (lacunae) for the bone cells and tiny channels through the bone interconnecting these cavities. ” Pictured is images of bone samples, with the circular-shape representing the bone cells that dissolved tissue

Even in the older sample of the jawless armored fish, the 3D images display a complex network with cavities (lacunae) for the bone cells and tiny channels through the bone interconnecting these cavities.

HZB expert Dr. Ingo Manke said: ‘The channels are a thousand times narrower than a human hair and yet, amazingly, they have been almost completely preserved over these 400 million years.’

The analysis also proved that early, jawless creatures had already possessed ‘bones characterized by internal structure similar to ours and probably by many similar physiological capabilities as well,’ said Dr Florian Witzmann who led the research.

The team speculates the ancient fish was able to obtain enough minerals, specifically phosphorous, in times of scarcity just by its bone cells dissolving tissue.

And this gave it an advantage over its more primitive contemporaries, who had cell-free bone.

‘This advantage apparently led to the widespread establishment of bones with bone cells in vertebrates, as we know it in humans as well. It is an important step towards understanding how our own bone metabolism came about,’ Haridy explained. 

As a summary, she emphasize: ‘Even in early fossil bone, bone cells could dissolve and restore bone minerals, this means that bones themselves act as batteries by storing minerals and releasing them later! 

This ability provided an undoubtable advantage to jawless fish with bone cells over vertebrates without. 

‘This advantage was possibly so profound as to alter vertebrate evolution, as later jawed vertebrates retained bone cells.’