Rare supermoon lights up the night sky in spectacular fashion

Rare supermoon lights up the Australian night sky in spectacular fashion – so did you catch a glimpse of the ‘pink’ phenomenon?

  • A rare full moon, dubbed the ‘Pink Moon’, put on a dazzling display over Australia’s night sky on Tuesday 
  • Sydneysiders stopped to gaze up at the astrological phenomenon as it carved a glowing orb on the horizon
  • Although supermoons typically occur once in 12 months, there are two this year –  in April and one on May 26

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If the fluorescent molten-orange orb pinned on the horizon was not pitched against the still, black night sky, you could be forgiven for thinking this April’s rare supermoon was a second sun. 

The astrological phenomenon, dubbed the ‘Pink Moon’, captivated Australians as it ascended over the skyline on Tuesday evening. 

The glowing sphere towered over iconic Australian landmarks, as it basked behind the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge, emitting golden rays as it cast a mighty presence in the night sky.  

Sydneysiders flocked to Bondi’s cliff tops on Tuesday night to catch a glimpse of this April’s rare ‘Pink’ supermoon as it lit up the sky 

A full moon is called a supermoon when it is at it's closest point to earth, making it look much larger and brighter

A full moon is called a supermoon when it is at it’s closest point to earth, making it look much larger and brighter

The stunning golden orb hovered over the Sydney Opera House on Tuesday night as it ascended over the horizon

The stunning golden orb hovered over the Sydney Opera House on Tuesday night as it ascended over the horizon 

Sydneysiders flocked to the cliff tops at Bondi Beach to stare in amazement as the marvel hovered overhead, appearing almost close enough to touch. 

A full moon is called a supermoon when it is at it’s closest point to earth, making it look much larger and brighter.  

On average, supermoons are about seven per cent bigger and about 15 per cent brighter than a typical full moon – but this one was twice as dazzling.   

With 30 percent more luminescent and 14 percent more voluminous than the usual full moon, this supermoon was a unique wonder as it hovered close to earth. 

The astrological phenomenon towered over rooftops and the Sydney Harbour bridge, as the rare full moon was 30 per cent brighter and 14 per cent bigger than normal

The astrological phenomenon towered over rooftops and the Sydney Harbour bridge, as the rare full moon was 30 per cent brighter and 14 per cent bigger than normal 

The natural wonder drew crowds as many stopped to watch the captivating sight as it hung in the sky over Bondi Beach

The natural wonder drew crowds as many stopped to watch the captivating sight as it hung in the sky over Bondi Beach 

A group of men and women rug up to brace the Autumn temperatures as they head out to check out the supermoon at Bondi

A group of men and women rug up to brace the Autumn temperatures as they head out to check out the supermoon at Bondi

The name derives from the early springtime blooms of certain flowers native to eastern North America that are commonly known as creeping phlox – but has been referred to ‘moss pink.’

Australians should have a great view of the full moon for the entirety of Tuesday night, however the most impressive vantage times were at sunrise and sunset when it was closest to the horizon. 

Although the spectacle will be at its brightest on Tuesday, the rare moon put on an early show on Monday afternoon as it basked on the skyline just above roof tops in Sydney’s east.

Locals walking along Bondi Beach could be seen stopping to gaze up at the marvel as it carved a goldish orb on the horizon.  

Although the peak viewing time was on Tuesday, the vibrant astrological phenomon lit up the sky over Bondi on Monday night

Although the peak viewing time was on Tuesday, the vibrant astrological phenomon lit up the sky over Bondi on Monday night 

Locals walking by the beach could be seen stopping to gaze up at the rare full moon as it carve a huge orb on the horizon

Locals walking by the beach could be seen stopping to gaze up at the rare full moon as it carve a huge orb on the horizon 

Despite its name, the lunar surface does not glow pink, instead emitting a stunning goldish colour

Despite its name, the lunar surface does not glow pink, instead emitting a stunning goldish colour 

While supermoons typically only occur once every 12 to 14 months, this year we will be graced with two – just weeks apart.

The second supermoon is on Wednesday, May 26, which is also the date of a total lunar eclipse, so the moon will turn into a super blood moon.

The eclipse begins at 6.47pm AEST and will peak at 9.18pm. This blood moon will be a reddish colour due to earth’s shadow covering the moon.

WHAT IS A FULL PINK MOON AND WHERE DOES IT GET ITS NAME? 

The phenomenon, known as the ‘Pink Moon’, earns its name from the flowering of the brightly-coloured herb ‘moss pink,’ which typically coincides with its arrival. 

It’s also known as the Egg Moon, Sprouting Grass Moon, Growing Moon or Full Fish Moon. 

The name comes from the Herb moss pink phlox, or ‘wild ground’ phlox, which blooms in early spring in the US and Canada.

 In the Northern Hemisphere, the April full moon lines up with the blooming of one of spring’s earliest-flowering plants – wild ground phlox, or ‘moss pink’. 

The pink moon, which is also known as the grass moon and the egg moon, was given its moniker by Native Americans, who provided a name for each full moon to help them keep track of time. 

 Native Americans have a name for the full moon of every month in the calendar, including Wolf Moon for January, Snow Moon for February and Worm Moon for March – then Flower Moon in May.Strawberry Moon is for June, Buck Moon is for July and Sturgeon Moon is for August. 

In September, there is a Harvest Moon, Hunter’s Moon is in October, Beaver Moon is in November and Cold Moon is in December. 

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